First Lady Jill Biden Marks 50th Anniversary Of Title IX kostenlos streamen | dailyme

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First Lady Jill Biden Marks 50th Anniversary Of Title IX

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First Lady Jill Biden joined women's professional tennis icon Billie Jean King and an All-American high school track athlete to celebrate the 50th anniversary of Title IX in Washington Wednesday.The legislation was enacted in 1972 and prohibited discrimination on the basis of sex in federally funded education programs. It is credited with promoting gender equity in sports and advancing opportunities for millions of American women since then."Just look at the legacy it created," said Biden. "It's all around us today.""Here in the United States, millions of girls have grown up, able to play sports, to build self-reliance and self-esteem, to learn teamwork and leadership. And they've been able to get scholarships that put college within their reach.""Title IX is one of the most important pieces of legislation of the 20th century," said King. "It is a law that speaks to the importance of gender equity in this country. It stands as a benchmark of global significance."King pointed out that the primary beneficiaries of Title IX have been white suburban girls."Let's use this milestone anniversary to re-energize our focus on strengthening and advancing equity and opportunity for all girls and women, but especially those who have been left behind by the law," she said, pointing to girls of color, girls with disabilities, trans athletes, and all LGBTQ+ youth.The first lady also lauded the State Department's Global Sports Mentoring Program, now celebrating its 10th anniversary.Additional reporting by The Associated Press.

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FDA Bans Juul E-Cigarettes Tied To Teen Vaping Surge kostenlos streamen | dailyme

FDA Bans Juul E-Cigarettes Tied To Teen Vaping Surge

Federal health officials on Thursday ordered Juul to pull its electronic cigarettes from the U.S. market, the latest blow to the embattled company widely blamed for sparking a national surge in teen vaping.The action is part of a sweeping effort by the Food and Drug Administration to bring scientific scrutiny to the multibillion-dollar vaping industry after years of regulatory delays.The FDA said Juul must stop selling its vaping device and its tobacco and menthol flavored cartridges. Those already on the market must be removed. Consumers aren't restricted from having or using Juul's products, the agency said.To stay on the market, companies must show that their e-cigarettes benefit public health. In practice, that means proving that adult smokers who use them are likely to quit or reduce their smoking, while teens are unlikely to get hooked on them.The FDA noted that some of the biggest sellers like Juul may have played a "disproportionate" role in the rise in teen vaping. The agency said Thursday that Juul's application didn't have enough evidence to show that marketing its products "would be appropriate for the protection of the public health."A Juul representative did not immediately respond to a request for comment from The Associated Press.In a statement, the FDA said Juul's application left regulators with significant questions and didn't include enough information to evaluate any potential risks. The agency said the company's research included "insufficient and conflicting data" about things like potentially harmful chemicals leaching from Juul's cartridges."Without the data needed to determine relevant health risks, the FDA is issuing these marketing denial orders." Michele Mital, acting director of the FDA's tobacco center, said in the statement.The agency has granted some e-cigarette applications. Since last fall, the agency has given its OK to tobacco-flavored e-cigarettes from R.J. Reynolds, Logic and other companies.But industry players and anti-tobacco advocates have complained that those products account for just a tiny percent of the $6 billion vaping market in the U.S.Regulators repeatedly delayed making decisions on devices from market leaders, including Juul, which remains the best-selling vaping brand although sales have dipped.Last year, the agency rejected applications for more than a million other e-cigarettes and related products, mainly due to their potential appeal to underage teens.The American Lung Association called Thursday's decision "long overdue and most welcome," and cited Juul for stoking youth vaping.E-cigarettes first appeared in the U.S. more than a decade ago with the promise of providing smokers a less harmful alternative. The devices heat a nicotine solution into a vapor that's inhaled, bypassing many of the toxic chemicals produced by burning tobacco.But studies have reached conflicting results about whether they truly help smokers quit. And efforts by the FDA to rule on vaping products and their claims were repeatedly slowed by industry lobbying and competing political interests.The vaping market grew to include hundreds of companies selling an array of devices and nicotine solutions in various flavors and strengths.The vaping issue took on new urgency in 2018 when Juul's high-nicotine, fruity-flavored cartridges quickly became a nationwide craze among middle and high school students. The company faces a slew of federal and state investigations into its early marketing practices, which included distributing free Juul products at concerts and parties hosted by young influencers.In 2019, the company was pressured into halting all advertising and eliminating its fruit and dessert flavors. The next year, the FDA limited flavors in small vaping devices to just tobacco and menthol. Separately, Congress raised the purchase age for all tobacco and vaping products to 21.But the question of whether e-cigarettes should remain on the market at all remained.The FDA has been working under a court order to render its decisions; anti-tobacco groups successfully sued the agency to speed up its review.FDA regulators warned companies for years they would have to submit rigorous, long-term data showing a clear benefit for smokers who switch to vaping. But all but the largest e-cigarette manufacturers have resisted conducting that kind of expensive, time-consuming research.While Juul remains a top seller, a recent federal survey shows that teens have been shifting away from the company. Last year's survey showed Juul was the fourth most popular e-cigarette among high schoolers who regularly vape. The most popular brand was a disposable e-cigarette called Puff Bar that comes in flavors like pink lemonade, strawberry and mango. That company's disposable e-cigarettes had been able to skirt regulation because they use synthetic nicotine, which until recently was outside the FDA's jurisdiction.

Murder Conviction Overturned In Georgia Hot Car Death Case kostenlos streamen | dailyme

Murder Conviction Overturned In Georgia Hot Car Death Case

Georgia's highest court on Wednesday overturned the murder and child cruelty convictions against a man whose toddler son died after he left him in a hot car for hours, saying the jury saw evidence that was extremely and unfairly prejudicial.Justin Ross Harris, 41, was convicted in November 2016 on eight counts including malice murder in the death of his 22-month-old son, Cooper. A judge sentenced him to life without parole as well as 32 more years in prison for other crimes.All of the Georgia Supreme Court justices agreed that there was sufficient evidence to support Harris' convictions, but the 134-page majority opinion written by Chief Justice David Nahmias says that much of the evidence having to do with Harris' sexual activities shouldn't have been admitted and may have improperly influenced the jury. The ruling means that Harris is entitled to a new trial on the murder and child cruelty charges against him.The high court upheld Harris convictions on three sex crimes committed against a 16-year-old girl that Harris had not appealed. He received a total of 12 years in prison for those crimes.The Cobb County District Attorney's office plans to file a motion for reconsideration in the case, according to an emailed statement.Prosecutors argued that Harris was unhappy in his marriage and intentionally killed his son to free himself. To support this theory, they presented extensive evidence of extramarital sexual activities that he engaged in, including exchanging sexually explicit messages and graphic photos with women and girls and meeting some of them for sex.Defense attorneys described him as a doting father and said the boys death was a tragic accident.The 6-3 majority opinion says that the jury heard and saw an extensive amount of improperly admitted evidence. It says that as prosecutors painted Harris as a man who "intentionally and maliciously" abandoned his child to die in the summer heat, they also presented a substantial amount of evidence to lead the jury to answer a different and more legally problematic question: what kind of man is (Harris)?Harris, who moved from Tuscaloosa, Alabama, to the Atlanta area for work in 2012, told police he forgot to drop his son off at day care on the morning of June 18, 2014, driving straight to his job as a web developer for Home Depot without remembering that Cooper was still in his car seat.Cooper died after sitting for about seven hours in the back seat of the Hyundai Tucson SUV outside his fathers office in suburban Atlanta, where temperatures that day reached at least into the high 80s.No one disputes that Harris left his son in the SUV rather than dropping him off at day care and that the heat in the vehicle caused the boy's death. The only disputed issue was whether Harris intentionally and maliciously left his child to suffer that painful death, Nahmias wrote.While some of the evidence was appropriate to establish the prosecutions theory of Harris motive, the trial court should have excluded much of it, Nahmias wrote. Highly prejudicial evidence included evidence that Harris exchanged lewd and sometimes illegal messages and photos with four minors, color photos of his genitals taken from text messages and blown up to show in court, and evidence that he had hired a prostitute, the opinion says.Additional reporting by The Associated Press.

Supreme Court Strikes Down New York Gun Law, Expanding Gun Rights kostenlos streamen | dailyme

Supreme Court Strikes Down New York Gun Law, Expanding Gun Rights

The Supreme Court said Thursday that Americans have a right to carry guns in public, a major expansion of gun rights.The justices 6-3 decision follows a series of recent mass shootings and is expected to ultimately allow more people to legally carry guns on the streets of the nations largest cities including New York, Los Angeles and Boston and elsewhere. About a quarter of the U.S. population lives in states expected to be affected by the ruling, the high courts first major gun decision in more than a decade.SEE MORE: Senators Reach Bipartisan Compromise On Gun Violence BillThe ruling comes as Congress is actively working on gun legislation following recent mass shootings in Texas,New York and California.Justice Clarence Thomas wrote for the majority that the Constitution protects "an individuals right to carry a handgun for self-defense outside the home.In their decision, the justices struck down a New York law requiring people to demonstrate a particular need for carrying a gun in order to get a license to carry one in public. The justices said the requirement violates the Second Amendment right to keep and bear arms.California, Hawaii, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Jersey and Rhode Island all have similar laws.Backers of New Yorks law had argued that striking it down would ultimately lead to more guns on the streets and higher rates of violent crime. The decision comes at a time when gun violence already on the rise during the coronavirus pandemic has spiked anew.In most of the country gun owners have little difficulty legally carrying their weapons in public. But that had been harder to do in New York and the handful of states with similar laws. New Yorks law, which has been in place since 1913, says that to carry a concealed handgun in public, a person applying for a license has to show proper cause, a specific need to carry the weapon.The state issues unrestricted licenses where a person can carry their gun anywhere and restricted licenses that allow a person to carry the weapon but just for specific purposes such as hunting and target shooting or to and from their place of business.The Supreme Court last issued a major gun decision in 2010. In that decision and a ruling from 2008 the justices established a nationwide right to keep a gun at home for self-defense. The question for the court this time was about carrying one outside the home.Additional reporting by The Associated Press.

Proud Boys Riot Trial Delayed Due To Committee Hearings kostenlos streamen | dailyme

Proud Boys Riot Trial Delayed Due To Committee Hearings

A federal judge agreed on Wednesday to postpone a trial for the former leader of the Proud Boys and other members of the extremist group charged with attacking the U.S. Capitol to stop Congress from certifying President Joe Biden's 2020 electoral victory.U.S. District Judge Timothy Kelly postponed the start of the trial from Aug. 8 to Dec. 12 after attorneys for several of the men argued that their clients couldn't get a fair trial by an impartial jury in the midst of televised hearings by the House committee investigating the Capitol attack. They're also waiting for the committee to share documents that could become trial evidence.Former Proud Boys national chairman Henry "Enrique" Tarrio and four other men are charged with seditious conspiracy for what authorities say was a plot to forcibly oppose the lawful transfer of presidential power during the joint session of Congress on Jan. 6, 2021.Tarrio, 38, of Miami, and his co-defendants Ethan Nordean, Joseph Biggs, Zachary Rehl and Dominic Pezzola have been in federal custody for months.Their trial is expected to last four to six weeks, stretching into next year.Biggs, Pezzola and Rehl asked for the trial to be postponed. Biggs' lawyer, J. Daniel Hull, noted that the House committee isn't expected to release hundreds of deposition and interview transcripts until after an August trial would have started."The transcripts are must-haves for trial preparation," Hull wrote.SEE MORE: Concerns Of More Fascist Groups Organizing Online Hate GroupsJustice Department prosecutors consented to the delay. They said the House committee's failure to share the deposition and interview transcripts is also hampering their ability to investigate and prosecute Jan. 6 defendants.Tarrio was opposed to delaying the trial."Tarrio believes that an impartial jury will never be achieved in Washington, D.C., whether the trial is in August, December, or next year," his lawyers wrote.Nordean's attorneys objected to postponing the trial for months while keeping Proud Boys leaders locked up in pretrial detention.Police arrested Tarrio in Washington two days before the Capitol riot on Jan. 6, 2021, and charged him with vandalizing a Black Lives Matter banner at a historic Black church during a protest in December 2020. Tarrio wasn't in Washington when the riot erupted, but authorities say he helped put into motion the violence that disrupted Congress from certifying President Biden's victory over Donald Trump.The seditious conspiracy indictment alleges that the Proud Boys held meetings and communicated over encrypted messages to plan for the attack in the days leading up to Jan. 6. On the day of the riot, Proud Boys members carried out a coordinated plot to storm past police barricades and attack the building with a mob of Trump supporters, the indictment says.Nordean, 31, of Auburn, Washington, was a Proud Boys chapter president. Biggs, 38, of Ormond Beach, Florida, was a self-described Proud Boys organizer. Rehl, 36, was president of the Proud Boys chapter in Philadelphia. Pezzola, 44, was a Proud Boys member from Rochester, New York.Two other Proud Boys members Matthew Greene, of Syracuse, New York, and Charles Donohoe, of Kernersville, North Carolina have pleaded guilty to conspiracy charges and agreed to cooperate with the Justice Department.Vice Media co-founder Gavin McInnes, who founded the Proud Boys in 2016, sued the Southern Poverty Law Center for labeling it a hate group. Proud Boys members call it a politically incorrect men's club for "Western chauvinists." They have frequently brawled with antifascist activists at rallies and protests.Approximately 40 Proud Boys leaders, members or associates have been charged in the Jan. 6 siege. More than 800 people have been charged with federal crimes related to the riot.Also on Wednesday, prosecutors in the seditious conspiracy case against members of another extremist group the Oath Keepers asked the judge to look into whether the payment of at least some of the defense lawyers by an organization controlled by lawyer Sidney Powell runs afoul of court rules.Prosecutors pointed to articles from Mother Jones and BuzzFeed that said Powell's group, Defending the Republic, is paying some defense attorneys' fees. Powell was part of Trump's legal team that pushed unfounded conspiracy theories alleging voter fraud in an effort to keep the Republican president in office following the 2020 election.Prosecutors say such an arrangement may violate a rule that says lawyers shouldn't accept money for representing a client from anyone other than the client unless three conditions are met, including that "there is no interference with the lawyer's independence of professional judgment or with the client-lawyer relationship."Additional reporting by The Associated Press


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