Newsy kostenlos streamen | dailyme

Newsy

Watch breaking news videos, including world news, science news, tech news, political news with Newsy.


Videos

How is winter changing? kostenlos streamen | dailyme

How is winter changing?

How did Americans prepare for Christmas in December 2022? By bundling up. "Five to 10 minutes outside and your skin can start freezing," said Kelly Serr, the warning coordination meteorologist at the National Weather Service. Heres how the freeze developed until the coldest day December 23. During that time, the rest of the planet wasnt very cold. In fact, big parts of South America, Africa and Southeast Asia experienced temperatures between 10 and 20 degrees warmer than usual.Since 1970, winter in a majority of areas have warmed by three degrees, according to the scientific non-profit Climate Central. And their research shows in three quarters of the areas they analyzed, winter is the fastest warming season, the coldest days are getting warmer. Overall, winters are getting warmer, with less snow. But when there are winter storms climate change may favor really big storms. The jet stream plays a big role. It's a river of air flow which separates cold air in the north from warmer air in the south above it lies the polar vortex. Usually its air swirls in a circle more than six miles up, and arctic air remains confined by the jet stream. But recently scientists discovered that since 1980, the polar vortex has more and more often been stretched into the shape of an oval or barbell.SEE MORE: Generators, spoiled food: Slow power repairs anger Austin, TexasScientists said a warmer arctic reduced sea ice and snow in Asia, but was also causing the vortex to stretch, according to a report in Science Magazine.The result? The jet stream is occasionally meandering far south across North America. And it sends cold blasts across the continent. A warmer winter is preventing ice from forming on the Great Lakes, which have steadily lost ice cover since the 1970s. Thats created lake effect snow and rain. Out west, USDA data shows how the season to accumulate valuable snowpack has shrunk. Snowpack stores water for the summer. The snowpack season is up to a month shorter than before. It's depriving states of meltwater in the hottest months. Winter sports like skiing are up against new challenges.  The National Ski Areas Association reports there were 529 ski areas operating in 1992.  Three decades later, that number had plummeted to 473. And the resorts that are open are increasingly making their own snow, says Chuck Randles, with Wilmot Mountain in Wisconsin.  "Snowmaking is absolutely critical to our business. Here at Wilmot, we have received very little natural snow, and we're open with almost 50% of our terrain here in mid-January despite not having any snow. That wouldn't be possible without snowmaking," Randles said.The future of winter is warmer temperatures, less snow and less ice: anew reality whether youre a skier or just a kid who loves the joys of winter.  

Biden to push for bipartisanship in State of the Union address kostenlos streamen | dailyme

Biden to push for bipartisanship in State of the Union address

President Joe Biden will deliver his State of the Union address before a joint session of Congress on Tuesday night. This will be the first time he will be delivering the speech to a divided Congress. Republicans took control of the House of Representatives following a victory in the midterm elections.Part of President Biden's speech will focus on how Democrats and Republicans can work together.He will call for unity in an effort to fight and end cancer. President Biden wants Congress to reauthorize the National Cancer Act. The White House says a reauthorization will allow for the nations cancer research and care systems to be updated. It adds that this would allow for the information from research to be accessed by as many experts as possible so they can work to end cancer as we know it.SEE MORE: Do State of the Union speeches still matter?President Biden believes he can also find bipartisan support for assisting veterans and their families. The president will lay out a vision to help veterans access better health care, education and housing.President Biden will also call for lawmakers to help address veteran suicides. The administration says more than 71,000 veterans have died by suicide since 2010.The president will also call for Republicans and Democratic lawmakers to work together on tackling the mental health crisis in the U.S. The main objectives will be to support healthy environments, strengthen system capacity and connect more Americans to care.President Biden is also seeking bipartisanship to tackle the opioid and overdose epidemic. He believes lawmakers can support the administration's efforts to disrupt tracking and the distribution of fentanyl.One of the guests seated in the first lady's viewing box is Doug Griffin. He lost his 20-year-old daughter to a fentanyl overdose. He's calling for better access to substance use disorder treatment services.SEE MORE: State of the Union 2023 viewing guideThe ambassador of Ukraine, Oksana Markarova, was also asked to sit in the first lady's viewing box. The White House has praised Markarova for her work during Russia's invasion of Ukraine.RowVaughn and Rodney Wells will also be in attendance. They are calling for police reform in the wake of their son's death. He died after a beating by Memphis police officers.The State of the Union will air Tuesday at 9 p.m. ET, 6 p.m. PT.

Coyotes, sharpshooters, and the wildlife debate dividing a small town kostenlos streamen | dailyme

Coyotes, sharpshooters, and the wildlife debate dividing a small town

From the inside of her living room, Anna Cox looks out over the Atlantic Ocean. The sun's rays on a recent January morning are flickering off the horizon as she begins to talk about the coyote problem that has divided the small seaside town of Nahant, Massachusetts.Back in 2020, Cox's 10-month-old cat, Jackie, went missing. A few days later, a neighbor posted a picture of Jackie's remains on a community Facebook page. Cox knew from the collar in the picture it was her missing cat. Two years later, the ordeal has still left her shaken."It was gut-wrenching. Her collar had a little bell and that probably led them right to her," Cox said with a small crack in her voice.It was a painful life lesson for this former first-grade teacher, who quickly learned she was not alone in her grief."People really didn't start caring until the dogs were being eaten," Cox noted.In recent years, Nahant, a seaside town of 3,000, has seen an increasing number of coyote attacks on animals. Coyotes have become so pervasive on this peninsula that day or night, residents out on walks do whatever they can to protect themselves and their pets. Some carry baseball bats, and others, like Tim Brennan, carry large walking sticks to haze coyotes away if needed.SEE MORE: The Endangered Species Act turns 50 this year"This is just part of our daily lives. They're very much present," Brennan said.Resident Carl Lanzilli even purchased a $100 coyote jacket, lined with metal spikes, to protect his small dog, Coco."If the coyote goes for his throat, this will stop it," Lanzilli said as he loaded Coco into the front seat of his SUV.Multiple Facebook groups, like Nahant Coyote Victims, help residents here keep track of sightings and attacks. No humans have ever been hurt. But the tides have shifted so much in Nahant that sharpshooters from the U.S. Department of Agriculture were called in last year to help bring down coyote numbers.Because of how densely populated the peninsula is, hunting isn't legal here under Massachusetts law. The decision to bring in sharpshooters has divided this 1 square mile of land.Cox, who lost her cat, is among those who feel something needed to be done."I think their numbers are too high, and I don't have a problem with them being exterminated," she said.Coyotes can be found in every U.S. state except Hawaii. Increasingly, they're making homes in more heavily populated areas, where hunting isn't permitted, making what's happened in Nahant a tale of note for communities nationwide.Animal advocate Deb Newman, who lives in nearby Swampscott, Massachusetts, said the issue has been divisive."The people who were in support of protecting the coyotes many of them were afraid to say anything," Newman said.SEE MORE: New law will shake up the exotic animal industry in the USIt is unclear just how many coyotes those USDA sharpshooters have killed since being called in.A spokesperson for the USDA told Scripps News in an email that the Nahant coyote removal program that started in December is ongoing and that it could take several months before more information is released at the end of the operation.As for the town, Nahant Town Administrator Antonio Barletta said, "The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Wildlife Services professionals are working in Nahant under the terms of the Cooperative Services Agreement with the town. Their work addresses a significant issue in our community."For now, residents like Cox are doing whatever they can to keep their pets safe. Cox recently adopted a new cat, Lexi, and she carries whistles and an air horn with her wherever she goes. Both were provided by the town to help prevent attacks.Cox's hope is that her idyllic New England seaside town goes back to its tranquil state of being."I can acknowledge they're beautiful, but if the numbers dwindled, then we'll know something happened," Cox said.

Ticket demand, anticipation grows as LeBron nears Kareem record kostenlos streamen | dailyme

Ticket demand, anticipation grows as LeBron nears Kareem record

Courtside seats 166 and 167 at the arena where the Los Angeles Lakers play their home games are pretty much as good as it gets.The people occupying those chairs when LeBron James breaks Kareem Abdul-Jabbar's NBA scoring record will have an up-close view, with their feet on the very hardwood where the history-making shot happens.History, in this case, comes with a cost.On Monday, those seats for Tuesday's game against the Oklahoma City Thunder could have been had for $75,000 each. Total price for the two seats with Ticketmaster fees: $181,500. And there's no guarantee James will even break the record Tuesday; in fact, at his current scoring pace, he would be just shy of the mark when the Thunder game ends.Which is why those same seats are even pricier Thursday for the Lakers' next game against the Milwaukee Bucks the two teams Abdul-Jabbar played for during his Hall of Fame career. For that game: $242,000, including the fees. But history suggests prices will come down; industry experts have long said extravagantly priced tickets rarely fetch the giant number listed.Don't be mistaken, though. The best seats will still cost plenty.SEE MORE: Lakers' LeBron James closes in on all-time scoring record"For the game on Thursday, we did sell a pair of tickets, courtside seats, for $24,000 a ticket, $48,000 total," said Kyle Zorn, a brand manager at the online ticket marketplace TickPick. "I feel like people are betting on the storyline that he does it against Kareem's former team, but he could easily score 36 points Tuesday and then the market for the game Thursday could completely crash."Whenever the record falls maybe Tuesday, maybe Thursday, and it's doubtful the chase goes past that unless James isn't playing for some reason it will be an event.The NBA has already changed the national television schedule for Tuesday, rearranging things to get the Lakers-Thunder game into the second slot of the usual TNT doubleheader for that night with Commissioner Adam Silver saying the league wanted to make sure it got as many eyeballs on the record-breaking moment as possible.The Lakers will be back on TNT against the Bucks on Thursday, plus have another national TV audience awaiting Saturday when they visit Golden State on ABC. Those were previously scheduled that way, no rearranging required.Silver said the NBA will pay tribute when James passes Abdul-Jabbar's total of 38,387 points, with likely a larger-scale celebration of the record at All-Star weekend in Salt Lake City later this month.SEE MORE: LeBron James named Time's 2020 Athlete of the Year"There's no doubt we will stop that game and make sure we record for history, the ball, the basket, the uniform," Silver said. "We'll stop and make sure that we've done our jobs as the archivists of the NBA. At the same time, there's that balance that they will be playing against a team that will very much want to win that night and not be distracted. Most likely we will do something in the moment."Common sense will likely prevail there: If James gets the record with a minute to go in a close game, for example, the NBA probably won't interrupt the proceedings with a lengthy stoppage. If it happens early, a brief halting of play wouldn't be unprecedented.But for those who want to see it all happen in person, whether that's from courtside seats or the upper levels of the arena, it'll still cost a pretty penny.Speaking Monday, and with the market likely to fluctuate until game time, Zorn said the cheapest get-in-the-door price for Tuesday's game was around $176 about half what it was a week ago, with most people guessing the record falls against the Bucks and $796 for Thursday's game."It's weird how prices for the game on Tuesday have decreased so significantly, as if it's like a guarantee that he's breaking it on Thursday," Zorn said.Many price points are likely out of reach for most fans. Then again, if there's a Thunder fan in L.A. who really wants to see their team, they might just want to wait for March 24. The Thunder will be back that night.Cheapest ticket right now for that game about $60.Additional reporting by The Associated Press.

Lucky player in Washington wins $754.6M Powerball prize kostenlos streamen | dailyme

Lucky player in Washington wins $754.6M Powerball prize

Someone in Washington state overcame steep odds to win a $754.6 million Powerball jackpot.The winning numbers Monday night were 5, 11, 22, 23, 69 and the Powerball 7.Lottery officials said in a statement early Tuesday that a single ticket matched all six numbers and that ticket sales pushed the jackpot higher than an earlier $747 million estimate.The full jackpot is for a winner opting for an annuity distributed in one immediate but partial payout followed by additional payments over 29 years that increase by 5% annually. The winner also can opt for a one-time cash payment of $407.2 million.Both prizes available are the amounts before taxes, Powerball said.SEE MORE: What should you do if you win the Powerball lottery?The jackpot for the next drawing scheduled for Wednesday is $20 million, according to the lottery's website.Monday night's win was the first Powerball jackpot win since Nov. 19. That winless streak allowed the prize to grow larger and larger until it stood as the ninth-largest in U.S. history.Higher interest rates have allowed annuity payments to increase compared with earlier jackpots, when rates were lower. Most winners prefer the immediate cash prize.The games abysmal odds of 1 in 292.2 million are designed to build big prizes drawing more players. That strategy certainly has worked recently, as someone in Maine won a $1.35 billion Mega Millions prize in January and a California player hit a record $2.04 billion Powerball jackpot last November. No one has claimed either of those prizes.Powerball is played in 45 states, as well as Washington, D.C.; Puerto Rico; and the U.S. Virgin Islands.Additional reporting by The Associated Press.SEE MORE: Why does the lottery exist?

AMC to charge more for good seats in movie theaters kostenlos streamen | dailyme

AMC to charge more for good seats in movie theaters

Middle seats at many U.S. movie theaters just got more expensive.AMC Theatres, the nation's largest movie theater chain, on Monday unveiled a new pricing scheme in which seat location determines how much your movie ticket costs. Seats in the middle of the auditorium will cost a dollar or two more, while seats in the front row will be slightly cheaper.AMC said the pricing plan, dubbed "Sightline," has already been rolled out in some locations and, by the end of the year, will be in place at all domestic AMC theaters during showings after 4 p.m.Seats classified as "standard sightline" will be at the regular price. If you want to pay less for the "value sightline" seats, you have to be a member of the chain's subscription service, AMC Stubs.SEE MORE: Why don't more streaming services debut their films in theaters?As movie theaters have attempted to recover from the pandemic, exhibitors have increasingly looked at more variable pricing methods. That's included charging more for sought-after movies like "The Batman" in their first week of release.Last weekend, Paramount Pictures partnered with theater chains to offer slightly reduced ticket prices for the comedy "80 for Brady." And last year, during a dry spell in theaters, tickets at most movie theaters were $3 for "National Cinema Day."But in most circumstances, movie tickets are getting more expensive, especially when factoring in large-format screens and 3D showings. The average 3D premium format ticket for the biggest box-office hit in recent years, "Avatar: The Way of Water," was about $16.50.Additional reporting by the Associated Press.SEE MORE: Why do blockbuster movies cost so much to make?

Netflix password-sharing changes could push other platforms to follow kostenlos streamen | dailyme

Netflix password-sharing changes could push other platforms to follow

The streaming industry had a bad 2022 with its slowdown of subscriptions, sinking stock prices and a slew of layoffs and cancellations that drew the ire of fans.All of that drama didn't stop with the new year, and all eyes are on the streaming leader Netflix as it attempts to crack down on password sharing."Part of it is just what we call casual sharing which is people could pay, but they don't need to, and so they're borrowing somebody's account," said Gregory K. Peters, Netflix co-CEO. "So our job is to give them a little bit of a nudge and to create features that make transitioning to their own account easy and simple."Netflix is attempting to capitalize on a practice they arguably helped start: password sharing.While the company walked back some of its plans to require users to connect to their account at home every month, Netflix is still pursuing a way to charge an extra $3 to $4 a month to the 100 million estimated users who piggyback off other accounts.SEE MORE: Netflix sharing fees start soon heres how to transfer your profileA 2019 report from the research firm Parks Associates said streamers lost $9.1 billion to piracy and account-sharing, and by 2024, researchers estimated those losses could grow to $12.5 billion.Analysts at Cowen Inc. estimate that by adding in that extra fee for account-sharing users in North America, Netflix could make an additional $721 million in revenue this year."I think it's worth noting that this will not be a universally popular move," Peters said. "We'll see a bit of a cancel reaction to that."In other words, Netflix knows users are complaining about the changes, but that isn't going to stop the company from moving forward.Other experts say the streamer is underestimating the number of subscription cancellations it could face. It's worth noting that Netflix faces the issues of recession worries as well as major competition from Amazon Prime Video, Disney+ and the soon-to-be merged HBO Max and Discovery. Each of those platforms have relatively lax rules on password sharing, but that could change as the industry reigns in content spending, raises prices on consumers and focuses on the bottom line.SEE MORE: Why don't more streaming services debut their films in theaters?

Quake deaths pass 5,000 as Turkey, Syria seek survivors kostenlos streamen | dailyme

Quake deaths pass 5,000 as Turkey, Syria seek survivors

Rescuers in Turkey and war-ravaged Syria searched through the frigid night into Tuesday, hoping to pull more survivors from the rubble after a 7.8 magnitude earthquake killed more than 3,400 people and toppled thousands of buildings across a wide region.Authorities feared the death toll from Monday's pre-dawn earthquake and aftershocks would keep climbing as rescuers looked for survivors among tangles of metal and concrete spread across the region beset by Syria's 12-year civil war and refugee crisis.Survivors cried out for help from within mountains of debris as first responders contended with rain and snow. Seismic activity continued to rattle the region, including another jolt nearly as powerful as the initial quake. Workers carefully pulled away slabs of concrete and reached for bodies as desperate families waited for news of loved ones."My grandson is 1 1/2 years old. Please help them, please. ... They were on the 12th floor," Imran Bahur wept by her destroyed apartment building in the Turkish city of Adana on Monday.SEE MORE: Deadly earthquake exacerbates suffering of displaced SyriansTens of thousands who were left homeless in Turkey and Syria faced a night in the cold. In the Turkish city of Gaziantep, a provincial capital about 20 miles from the epicenter, people took refuge in shopping malls, stadiums, mosques and community centers. Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan declared seven days of national mourning.U.S. President Joe Biden called Erdogan to express condolences and offer assistance to the NATO ally. The White House said it was sending search-and-rescue teams to support Turkey's efforts.The quake, which was centered in Turkey's southeastern province of Kahramanmaras, sent residents of Damascus and Beirut rushing into the street and was felt as far away as Cairo.It piled more misery on a region that has seen tremendous suffering over the past decade. On the Syrian side, the area is divided between government-controlled territory and the country's last opposition-held enclave, which is surrounded by Russian-backed government forces. Turkey, meanwhile, is home to millions of refugees from the civil war.In the rebel-held enclave, hundreds of families remained trapped in rubble, the opposition emergency organization known as the White Helmets said in a statement. The area is packed with some 4 million people displaced from other parts of the country by the war. Many live in buildings that are already wrecked from military bombardments.SEE MORE: Turkey detains Syrian suspect in bombing that killed 6, injured dozensStrained medical centers quickly filled with injured people, rescue workers said. Some facilities had to be emptied, including a maternity hospital, according to the SAMS medical organization.More than 7,800 people were rescued across 10 provinces, according to Orhan Tatar, an official with Turkey's disaster management authority.The region sits on top of major fault lines and is frequently shaken by earthquakes. Some 18,000 were killed in similarly powerful earthquakes that hit northwest Turkey in 1999.The U.S. Geological Survey measured Monday's quake at 7.8, with a depth of 11 miles. Hours later, a 7.5 magnitude temblor, likely triggered by the first, struck more than 60 miles away.The second jolt caused a multistory apartment building in the Turkish city of Sanliurfa to topple onto the street in a cloud of dust as bystanders screamed, according to video of the scene.Thousands of buildings were reported collapsed in a wide area extending from Syria's cities of Aleppo and Hama to Turkey's Diyarbakir, more than 200 miles to the northeast.In Turkey alone, more than 5,600 buildings were destroyed, authorities said. Hospitals were damaged, and one collapsed in the city of Iskenderun.Bitterly cold temperatures could reduce the time frame that rescuers have to save trapped survivors, said Dr. Steven Godby, an expert in natural hazards at Nottingham Trent University. The difficulty of working in areas beset by civil war would further complicate rescue efforts, he said.Offers of help from search-and-rescue teams to medical supplies and money poured in from dozens of countries, as well as the European Union and NATO. The vast majority were for Turkey, with a Russian and even an Israeli promise of help to the Syrian government, but it was not clear if any would go to the devastated rebel-held pocket in the northwest.The opposition's Syrian Civil Defense described the situation in the enclave as "disastrous."The opposition-held area, centered on the province of Idlib, has been under siege for years, with frequent Russian and government airstrikes. The territory depends on a flow of aid from Turkey for everything from food to medical supplies.U.N. spokesman Stephane Dujarric said 224 buildings in northwestern Syrian were destroyed and at least 325 were damaged, including aid warehouses. The U.N. had been assisting 2.7

Rescuers scramble in Turkey, Syria after quake kills 3,400 kostenlos streamen | dailyme

Rescuers scramble in Turkey, Syria after quake kills 3,400

Rescuers in Turkey and war-ravaged Syria searched through the frigid night into Tuesday, hoping to pull more survivors from the rubble after a 7.8 magnitude earthquake killed more than 3,400 people and toppled thousands of buildings across a wide region.Authorities feared the death toll from Monday's pre-dawn earthquake and aftershocks would keep climbing as rescuers looked for survivors among tangles of metal and concrete spread across the region beset by Syria's 12-year civil war and refugee crisis.Survivors cried out for help from within mountains of debris as first responders contended with rain and snow. Seismic activity continued to rattle the region, including another jolt nearly as powerful as the initial quake. Workers carefully pulled away slabs of concrete and reached for bodies as desperate families waited for news of loved ones."My grandson is 1 1/2 years old. Please help them, please. ... They were on the 12th floor," Imran Bahur wept by her destroyed apartment building in the Turkish city of Adana on Monday.SEE MORE: Deadly earthquake exacerbates suffering of displaced SyriansTens of thousands who were left homeless in Turkey and Syria faced a night in the cold. In the Turkish city of Gaziantep, a provincial capital about 20 miles from the epicenter, people took refuge in shopping malls, stadiums, mosques and community centers. Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan declared seven days of national mourning.U.S. President Joe Biden called Erdogan to express condolences and offer assistance to the NATO ally. The White House said it was sending search-and-rescue teams to support Turkey's efforts.The quake, which was centered in Turkey's southeastern province of Kahramanmaras, sent residents of Damascus and Beirut rushing into the street and was felt as far away as Cairo.It piled more misery on a region that has seen tremendous suffering over the past decade. On the Syrian side, the area is divided between government-controlled territory and the country's last opposition-held enclave, which is surrounded by Russian-backed government forces. Turkey, meanwhile, is home to millions of refugees from the civil war.In the rebel-held enclave, hundreds of families remained trapped in rubble, the opposition emergency organization known as the White Helmets said in a statement. The area is packed with some 4 million people displaced from other parts of the country by the war. Many live in buildings that are already wrecked from military bombardments.SEE MORE: Turkey detains Syrian suspect in bombing that killed 6, injured dozensStrained medical centers quickly filled with injured people, rescue workers said. Some facilities had to be emptied, including a maternity hospital, according to the SAMS medical organization.More than 7,800 people were rescued across 10 provinces, according to Orhan Tatar, an official with Turkey's disaster management authority.The region sits on top of major fault lines and is frequently shaken by earthquakes. Some 18,000 were killed in similarly powerful earthquakes that hit northwest Turkey in 1999.The U.S. Geological Survey measured Monday's quake at 7.8, with a depth of 11 miles. Hours later, a 7.5 magnitude temblor, likely triggered by the first, struck more than 60 miles away.The second jolt caused a multistory apartment building in the Turkish city of Sanliurfa to topple onto the street in a cloud of dust as bystanders screamed, according to video of the scene.Thousands of buildings were reported collapsed in a wide area extending from Syria's cities of Aleppo and Hama to Turkey's Diyarbakir, more than 200 miles to the northeast.In Turkey alone, more than 5,600 buildings were destroyed, authorities said. Hospitals were damaged, and one collapsed in the city of Iskenderun.Bitterly cold temperatures could reduce the time frame that rescuers have to save trapped survivors, said Dr. Steven Godby, an expert in natural hazards at Nottingham Trent University. The difficulty of working in areas beset by civil war would further complicate rescue efforts, he said.Offers of help from search-and-rescue teams to medical supplies and money poured in from dozens of countries, as well as the European Union and NATO. The vast majority were for Turkey, with a Russian and even an Israeli promise of help to the Syrian government, but it was not clear if any would go to the devastated rebel-held pocket in the northwest.The opposition's Syrian Civil Defense described the situation in the enclave as "disastrous."The opposition-held area, centered on the province of Idlib, has been under siege for years, with frequent Russian and government airstrikes. The territory depends on a flow of aid from Turkey for everything from food to medical supplies.U.N. spokesman Stephane Dujarric said 224 buildings in northwestern Syrian were destroyed and at least 325 were damaged, including aid warehouses. The U.N. had been assisting 2.7

This group starts its mornings with a frigid Lake Michigan swim kostenlos streamen | dailyme

This group starts its mornings with a frigid Lake Michigan swim

At 6:30 a.m. on a frigid Sunday, most Chicagoans are still fast asleep. But one group of friends are already amped up.The air temperature is well below freezing. Lake Michigan is choppy and the water is nearly frozen.But Steve Hernan, the leader of the self-nicknamed "Lake Monsters," is ecstatic."Thirty-five Fahrenheit that's one degree centigrade, there we go," Hernan said after dropping a thermometer in the water. "The good news is it doesn't get much colder than this, so it's not like we will be surprised next week."In a few minutes, he and his swim buddies will hop in. But first comes the extra layers, as Hernan says keeping the core warm lets them be in the water longer. Then there's the shea butter, which provides an extra layer of protection to the exposed skin. Next up, hot water goes inside gloves and booties.When it's this cold, the prep work makes all the difference."I try to relax as much as possible," Hernan said. "Tension is the enemy."Hernan, who founded the group in 2007, has been waking up at the crack of dawn nearly every weekend for 15 years. "As a father of two young kids, it's one of the few times I just get some quiet time, to be honest," Hernan said.Even in the dead of winter, the 55-year-old manages to swim a quarter of a mile."You come out, your temperature after about 10 minutes just drops, so you start to shiver," Hernan said. "Then all of a sudden it'll stop, and you'll just be so relaxed, kind of like semi dreamy, idyllic state of kind of relaxation."SEE MORE: Cold and heat: Which is more dangerous and why?The science on cold-water immersion is inconclusive, but anecdotal evidence suggests it may have mental and physical benefits.Mike Tipton of the University of Portsmouth in the U.K. has been studying this for decades."The benefits you hear from people who are engaged in open water swimming are that it alerts them, awakens and sets them up for the day," Tipton said. "Immersion in cold water stimulates what we call the cold shock response, and that releases a lot of stress hormones. It's part of the fight or flight response, and that includes adrenaline, cortisol."But the jury is still out on how exactly that's beneficial.In the meantime, Tipton urges people to get a medical check-up before taking the plunge."People wouldn't step out of their door and just go run a marathon, and this is as stressful as that," Tipton said.Hernan is aware of the risks. In the wintertime, he stops posting the time and location of the swim meet ups online. Instead, those who want to come need to email him first."I've got a winter swimming guide that I send to them that talks about gear, that talks about preparation, that talks about what to expect so that way they can make the decision, and then they're kind of qualified coming out," Hernan said.Hernan, a business analyst, keeps a meticulous photo archive of his group swims, including meet ups in some of the roughest conditions imaginable. He also keeps a spreadsheet with the names of all 559 Lake Monsters, each of whom has an assigned number."They'll send me a note and they'll say, 'Hey, I'm going to be in town Steve. This is Fred, you know, Lake Monster 43,' or whatever. And it's like, right on," Hernan said.Because Lake Michigan is a different beast in the winter, Hernan has one more nickname for those who brave it all year round."Congratulations, you are now an ice monster," Hernan said.To date, there are only 31 ice monsters. As a reward, Hernan hands newly minted members a sticker that says 32.1 degrees."It's the lowest the lake gets that you can still swim," Hernan said.For Hernan, the nicknames are all about creating a sense of community. He says that's his true legacy with Open Water Chicago, a group of like-minded swimmers who trust and encourage each other to keep coming out, week in and week out, no matter how cold it gets.SEE MORE: What brutal cold does to your body

D.C. pastors are promoting healthy living among congregants kostenlos streamen | dailyme

D.C. pastors are promoting healthy living among congregants

The food pantry at Urban Outreach in southeast D.C. is a bit more than meets the eye."We have a partnership with Amazon, so we get a lot of plant-based stuff from them," said Wil Stroman, a pastor and the co-director of Urban Outreach DC.It's part of a concerted effort to bring healthy options to the community.A few years ago, Stroman joined American University and Wesley Theological Seminarys Faithfully Fit program. It's a D.C. government-backed initiative turning people of the cloth from historically Black churches into ministers of health.The program doesn't stop with handing out fresh fruits and veggies to more than 250 families a week."We do everything from food demonstrations to creative outreach programs, movie nights that highlight healthy eating," Stroman said.Its about providing access to those foods in the first place.  "Here we are in our nation's capital," Stroman said. "When I first started, if I remember the statistics right, like one out of every three kids went to bed hungry every night just in this community here.""The location is important to residents in this neighborhood because if you leave the church, it's another two-mile drive to the closest full scale grocery store, and that's assuming you have a car in the first place," In D.C.'s Ward 7 where Urban Outreach is located two full-service grocers service about 77,000 people, forcing residents to find alternative food sources.SEE MORE: How Christians are coupling biblical concepts with mental wellnessA few miles away, pastor Freddie Davis and Mary Douglas Brown at Pilgrim Rest Baptist are also working to fill gaps in the community, offering both physical and mental health support to residents.For Brown, a breast cancer survivor, the mission is personal.Like Stroman, she also has a health minister certification, which she puts to use with the encouragement from Davis."It's been one of my primary concerns because the Bible teaches that God is concerned about the whole person, you know, body, soul and spirit," Davis said.Churches have long been a go-between for Black communities. For example, during the heart of the COVID-19, places of worship set up vaccination sites for neighborhoods.Faithfully Fit program coordinator Ayanna Wells and AU health studies department chair Stacey Snelling say the partnership was necessary. "If they don't trust the messaging and they don't trust the actual person in the face, then they're not going to do it, and it's not going to be absorbed into their culture," Wells said.While the messaging came easily, it's hard to ignore the social determinants of health that lead to poorer health outcomes in the first place."Residents in Ward 7 and 8 deserve many more options and not only at the corner stores," Snelling said. "To me, that is a stopgap measure."For Stroman and Brown, the connection between spirituality and wellness came easily, reinforcing their need to act."Safeguarding our health really helps us to fulfill our divine potential and helps us to serve others effectively," Stoman said."I used to sit in the pew doing nothing. Nothing," Brown said. "I used to come, but I did nothing. And thanks to pastor Davis, I got to be very active. I mean, I do a lot now."

Criminals now targeting zoo animals kostenlos streamen | dailyme

Criminals now targeting zoo animals

It's been a full month of vandalism, disappearances and even an animal death at the Dallas Zoo. "It's been an unbelievable three weeks for all of us here at the zoo. It's unprecedented what's happened here," said Gregg Hudson, CEO of the Dallas Zoo. And while the Dallas Zoo is breathing a sigh of relief after last weeks arrest zoo and wildlife industry officials are concerned this could have a broader impact.  "Our community has really taken this seriously and has redoubled its efforts around security," said Dan Ashe, president of  the Association of Zoos and Aquariums.Starting January 13, the Dallas Zoo had fences cut in two of its enclosures. A clouded leopard escaped from its habitat but was later found on the premises.  Then, just a week later, Dallas Zoo workers found a lappet-faced vulture dead. The Dallas Zoo CEO called it "very suspicious."And finally on Jan 30, two emperor tamarin monkeys were taken from the zoo and found several days later in a boarded-up home next to a church in South Dallas.  Dallas Police arrested Davion Irvin in connection with three of the four incidents charging him with six counts of animal cruelty and two counts of burglary.  We're determined to make sure that we do everything we can to not let this happen again. Obviously, this is an unprecedented level of things that we're going to have to do. But we're up to the challenge of that," Hudson said. SEE MORE: Man arrested in connection to Dallas Zoo monkey theftsBut in the weeks since these incidents began in Dallas, other zoos across the country have experienced similar vandalism.  A Eurasian eagle-owl escaped from the Central Park Zoo after vandals cut open its enclosure.  "Flacco cannot survive on his own in the wild. Flacco has been in captivity at the Central Park Zoo for over 12 years," said David Barret, a bird expert. Rescuers have kept an eye on the owl since its escape. In Louisiana, 12 squirrel monkeys were stolen from a local zoo after a break in.Ashe says these kinds of incidents raise concerns around copycat vandalism.  "There is a concern we could see more of this copycatting, if people are doing it because they believe they want to free animals from zoos it is not in the interest of the animals to do that," Ashe said.  Court documents show the tamarin monkeys from Dallas Zoo were being kept in an abandoned shack that had cat feces, mold and mildew and various dead animals inside.  "These are animals that normally live in the Amazon rainforest, very temperate warm place, and they were being held in in an abandoned facility where the temperature was 37 degrees," Ashe said. In response to the security breaches, the Dallas Zoo has instituted several new security measures added security patrols, overnight staffing and more cameras to the facility.   Those are steps Ashe says he expects to see more and more of, if incidents like this continue. "So all of our members are going to have to consider similar investments," Ashe said. 

Netflix password sharing changes could push other platforms to follow kostenlos streamen | dailyme

Netflix password sharing changes could push other platforms to follow

The streaming industry had a bad 2022 with its slowdown of subscriptions, sinking stock prices and a slew of layoffs and cancellations that drew the ire of fans.All of that drama didn't stop with the new year, and all eyes are on the streaming leader Netflix as it attempts to crack down on password sharing."Part of it is just what we call casual sharing which is people could pay, but they don't need to, and so they're borrowing somebody's account," said Gregory K. Peters, Netflix co-CEO. "So our job is to give them a little bit of a nudge and to create features that make transitioning to their own account easy and simple."Netflix is attempting to capitalize on a practice they arguably helped start: password sharing.While the company walked back some of its plans to require users to connect to their account at home every month, Netflix is still pursuing a way to charge an extra $3 to $4 a month to the 100 million estimated users who piggyback off other accounts.SEE MORE: Netflix sharing fees start soon heres how to transfer your profileA 2019 report from the research firm Parks Associates said streamers lost $9.1 billion to piracy and account-sharing, and by 2024, researchers estimated those losses could grow to $12.5 billion.Analysts at Cowen Inc. estimate that by adding in that extra fee for account-sharing users in North America, Netflix could make an additional $721 million in revenue this year."I think it's worth noting that this will not be a universally popular move," Peters said. "We'll see a bit of a cancel reaction to that."In other words, Netflix knows users are complaining about the changes, but that isn't going to stop the company from moving forward.Other experts say the streamer is underestimating the number of subscription cancellations it could face. It's worth noting that Netflix faces the issues of recession worries as well as major competition from Amazon Prime Video, Disney+ and the soon-to-be merged HBO Max and Discovery. Each of those platforms have relatively lax rules on password sharing, but that could change as the industry reigns in content spending, raises prices on consumers and focuses on the bottom line.SEE MORE: Why don't more streaming services debut their films in theaters?

Advocates still urging U.S. to release Native activist Leonard Peltier kostenlos streamen | dailyme

Advocates still urging U.S. to release Native activist Leonard Peltier

In the 1960s, young Indigenous people began to fight for greater recognition and rights to self-determination for their tribes. It was known as the "Red Power" movement and happened at the same time as young Black people were developing similar concepts in the Black Power movement.One significant action young activists took was the occupation of Alcatraz.In 1969, dozens of Indigenous activists moved onto the island that was home to the closed prison. They stayed there for over a year, alleging the government was violating its commitment in the 1851 Treaty of Fort Laramie to return out-of-use federal land to the local tribes who inhabited the area.The occupation was one of the earliest examples of Indigenous activism, but it also led to federal intelligence agencies targeting activists.After the Alcatraz occupation, the FBI targeted the American Indian Movement, or AIM. They sought to address poverty and discrimination and help Native Americans fight for the rights promised to tribes in treaties with the federal government.Feb. 6, 2023 marks 48 years to the day of the arrest of one of the American Indian Movement's most famous members, Leonard Peltier.Peltier, an activist of Lakota and Dakota descent and an enrolled member of the Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa, is the longest-held Indigenous prisoner in the U.S.SEE MORE: Freedmen fight for tribal citizenship on legal path marred by politicsActivists have spent years advocating for the release of the now 78-year-old.In 1976, he was arrested and later convicted for the killing of two FBI agents on the Pine Ridge Reservation in South Dakota. Peltier has admitted to participating in the shootout, but the evidence used to convict him has issues.One witness, who signed the affidavit, said she was Peltier's girlfriend and saw him kill the agents. She later recanted and said she had never met him.Scripps News spoke with another witness, Jean Roach. The Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe member is now the leader of the International Leonard Peltier Defense Committee, which is advocating for the Peltier's release. She remembers him playing a huge role in keeping her family safe."Me and my little brother was there with a lot of other people," Roach said. "Most of us were under the age of 18, and Leonard saved our lives. Leonard, Bob and Dino, our camp was attacked by the FBI. They didn't care that we had women, children, grandma and grandpa there. They just came in all crazy."In 2017, a senior U.S. attorney involved in the case urged President Barack Obama to give Peltier clemency. Presidents Bill Clinton, George W. Bush and Donald Trump also faced similar pushes to act on Peltier's case. But none did.Last November, seven U.S. senators wrote to President Biden asking him to commute Peltier's sentence. Still, nothing has changed.His case has been a human rights issue taken on by advocates both within the U.S. and abroad, including Pope Francis, the Dalai Lama, Archbishop Desmond Tutu, Nelson Mandela and Mother Teresa.Last summer, the U.N. Human Rights Council's Working Group on Arbitrary Detention wrote to the U.S. government calling Peltier's imprisonment arbitrary. They asked for his immediate release and compensation for his time in jail and gave the U.S. government six months to show what it's done to address the issues they laid out. That six-month window ended in late January, and it's unclear as of yet how or if the government responded.SEE MORE: First Americans Museum tells the Indigenous story of Oklahoma

Do State of the Union speeches still matter? kostenlos streamen | dailyme

Do State of the Union speeches still matter?

President Joe Biden is set to deliver his annual State of the Union address on Tuesday.The speech will be broadcast, like usual, at 9 p.m. ET, followed by the Republican response by Arkansas Governor Sarah Huckabee Sanders.But does this annual tradition of addressing Congress still have the same impact that it used to?A TRADITIONIt's the phrase that kicks off the night: "Mr. Speaker, the President of the United States."It is said traditionally by the sergeant at arms before the president walks into the House chamber.The annual prime-time speech doesn't actually have to happen, however.While President George Washington delivered one in person and so did President John Adams President Thomas Jefferson stopped it.Jefferson believed it felt too much like the King of England speaking to parliament. From 1801 until 1913 presidents delivered written annual reports to Congress instead, in order to fulfill their constitutional obligations.SEE MORE: State of the Union 2023 viewing guidePresident Woodrow Wilson brought back the practice in 1913 and with the invention of the radio and television, the in-person tradition has happened in most years since then. When President Biden speaks Tuesday, it will likely be his most-watched speech of the year.Over 38 million watched last year's address, which is a chance for President Biden to highlight past accomplishments, like legislation to boost computer chips. It's also a chance to express optimism for the year ahead.President Biden is expected to express that sentiment with the economy and with Ukraine's fight against Russia. It's also a chance for the president to demand bipartisanship from Congress, and he is expected to do so when it comes to the issue of the debt limit.The United States could default for the first time this summer if Congress doesn't raise the debt ceiling. The State of the Union is typically the only time each year that every Republican member of Congress and every Democratic member of Congress is in the same room listening to a presidential speech.SEE MORE: Sen. Kaine discusses President's address, economy, reelection and moreSometimes the address can feel long. The longest ever was President Bill Clinton's in 2000. Clinton went 1 hour and 28 minutes.The shortest address in modern times was President Richard Nixon's in 1972. Mr. Nixon spoke for just 28 minutes.President Biden's speech last year was 1 hour and 1 minute. There are critics though who say this speech isn't as influential as it used to be. Viewership has declined in recent years compared to the 1990s, and policy proposals have too.According to data compiled by the non-partisan Congressional Research Service, from 1965 to 2015, on average only 39.4% of all policy proposals contained in a State of the Union address were approved by Congress that same year.That means, statistically, most things President Biden mentions and wants Congress to accomplish won't actually happen this year.Not every important political figure will be in the House chamber on Tuesday night. In most years since the Cold War, one member of the president's cabinet has been designated the "designated survivor."They are kept in a secure location and away from the Capitol to ensure the continuity of government in the event of a mass casualty event.

From Great Resignation to Great Rethink, the workforce is changing kostenlos streamen | dailyme

From Great Resignation to Great Rethink, the workforce is changing

You've probably heard the term Great Resignation, which referred to the 25 million Americans quitting their jobs at the beginning of 2022. Now, experts are shifting the concept to the Great Reshuffle or Great Rethink, as this trend is far from over.The Great Resignation created the idea that people were leaving the labor force forever, but new hard data is proving differently. People didn't quit working altogether. Instead, they are switching jobs."Our society has been fundamentally changed by this disease, and I think this has given people pause about, 'Is this how I want to live my life?'" said David Blustein, a professor of counseling psychology at Boston College.In many cases, people left jobs that gave them little ability to have control over their lives. For quite some time, this seemed temporary, but experts are saying this shift is just the beginning of the next chapter of the workforce.A new study indicates that about 81% do not regret leaving their previous job and are generally happy about their workplace decisions. Blustein points out people are putting life before work something that up until this point has been foreign to the American workforce."What's going on is, I mean, I guess we can call it a 'Great Rethink' about work," Blustein said. "I think we're going to see this continue to evolve as the years and decades ensue."The reality, he says, is the newest generation of the workforce will avoid industries and companies that aren't providing flexibility. The focus is no longer on paying dues.SEE MORE: US added a strong 517,000 jobs in January despite Fed hikesDavid Bechtold is an associate professor of business management at Metropolitan State University in Denver. He says what's new is that people's trajectories have changed. The typical model of retirement is on the road to extinction."Though I still think there will be opportunities for people coming out to have a lot more control over what they are going to do and what they want to get out of their first job," Bechtold said. "So, we're really into a very unusual dynamic with a lot of uncertainty and a lot of erratic behavior."The pandemic opened up opportunities for untraditional work settings, but 2023 is proving those opportunities are now becoming models for how workplaces need to operate."The level of flexibility and freedom I think is a good thing because it requires employers to think through how are they going to acquire, manage and retain their employees," Bechtold said."It allowed people the experience that they could combine their personal and work lives. It will never go back," said Cristina Banks, the director of the Interdisciplinary Center for Health Workplaces at the University of California Berkeley.Banks says while more employers are getting on board with this shift, there is still a disconnect."Employers want it one way, and the newly empowered workers want it a different way," Banks said. "Employers are going to suffer by not evolving."She points out that employers are the ones currently at a disadvantage because at this moment, the options are plentiful for workers."There are still more jobs out there than employees to fill by significant number," Bechtold said.According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, in November of 2022, there were about 10.4 million jobs available, but just 6 million people were looking for a job."That will be the great equalizer. When there are more people entering the job market and there are fewer jobs to be filled," Bechtold said.The Great Resignation is in the past, but now, we are facing the Great Rethink, giving an opportunity for employees and employers to get on the same page about changes to the workforce that aren't going anywhere.SEE MORE: WTKR: Scammers luring job hunters with fake remote jobs

Why do blockbuster movies cost so much to make? kostenlos streamen | dailyme

Why do blockbuster movies cost so much to make?

If youre going to make a blockbuster you need some deep pockets. But how did we get to todays multi-million-dollar movie budgets? Hollywood wasnt always a high-rollers club. In 1913, Universal produced "Traffic In Souls" for $5,700. But as the industry expanded, so did costs. In Joel Finlers book "The Hollywood Story" he charts the rise. By 1920, a feature film cost an average of $60,000 to produce. That swelled to $375,000 by 1930. Part of the reason for rising costs was demand for high quality content, according to former TV network executive Tom Nunan. Nunan is the former president of NBC studios and UPN, professor at UCLA school of theater, film and television and producer of Oscar-winning film "Crash.""The American standard of filmmaking and creating content is the gold standard still around the world. So, when our budgets are going up, the money is generally going on the screen," he said.  MGM paid more than $2.7 million to make "The Wizard of Oz" in 1939 its most expensive production at the time.  And that was more than a decade before the average cost for a feature film topped one million dollars. By the 1970s, multi-million-dollar productions were commonplace, sparked by inflation and a new group of producers and directors looking to take Hollywood to new heights. Steven Spielbergs "Jaws" and George Lucas' "Star Wars" cost $7 and $11 million, respectively, and set the stage for studios to push the envelope with special effects. "Studios are having to go overboard coming up with ideas and directors and technology that will pay off to make these movie-going experiences worth the hassle of going out to movie theater," Nunan said. SEE MORE: 2023 Academy Award nominations are full of record-breakers, milestonesAnd that effort is because its getting harder to attract viewers. Movie theater attendance is dropping, a trend which actually started before the pandemic. To win over audiences, Nunan says studios are changing the way they think about productions. "In the 20th century, where we basically were watching movies that were character driven, that were based on movie stars and what their character was going through," he said. "And when we moved into the late 20th century, into the 21st century, the concept of the movie became the movie star. And the way that concept was executed in ways that no one could have ever imagined. The biggest change has been the introduction of the superhero tent-pole movie, where audiences expect spectacular special effects and action sequences." More recent movies like "Spider-man 3,""Justice League," and "Avengers: Endgame" each cost hundreds of millions of dollars due to hefty checks for stars and money for special effects. "The talent costs are the largest what we would call line item on a budget. And right below that would be on a kind of a graduated basis, special effects, visual effects, action sequences," Nunan said.  And even though some big-budget movies dont pay off, it remains to be seen if the industry will tighten its belt.  "The only evidence we have is that movies are getting bigger and more expensive. And I don't see that going away anytime soon," Nunan continued.Meaning that blockbuster movies could continue to have blockbuster price tags.

Sen. Kaine discusses President's address, economy, reelection and more kostenlos streamen | dailyme

Sen. Kaine discusses President's address, economy, reelection and more

One of the Senate's most influential voices Sen. Tim Kaine says he hopes President Joe Biden will tout the country's economic gains during the State of the Union Tuesday night, and also address that more needs to be done.  "Everywhere I go in Virginia, my employers it could be a restaurant be a hospital, could be a farmer could be a contracting firm they're having a hard time hiring enough people. So I want to hear about well, what are the strategies to make sure the American workforce is, you know, full and productive," Kaine said.  To help in that effort, Kaine is spearheading a bill to expand the type of learning Pell Grants can be used for. It's a mission that was a lonely one when he first introduced the idea in 2014. But with dozens of bipartisan cosponsors now, he thinks the time is right. "A lot of high-quality training for welding, iron working and some allied health professions, you can do a high-quality training program, and it tends to be an eight-week program. That's eight hours a day, five days a week. So, 40 times eight, 320 hours it's often five times as many classroom hours as a 15-week college course, but you can't get a Pell Grant for it," said Kaine.  The president is likely to address the debt limit debate in his Tuesday night speech. Kaine supports President Biden's call to keep budget cuts as a separate issue. If Republicans want to reduce spending, Kaine says they have a chance to do that every year during budget negotiations. SEE MORE: State of the Union 2023 viewing guide"If Republicans want to lower spending, then they write a budget that lowers spending. Now, the Democratic Senate will probably write a different budget, but then, we have to sit down and hash it out. I think the public does want to see us negotiate, but they want to see us negotiate on spending, not negotiate about whether America is suddenly going to be a deadbeat creditor for the first time in our history," said Kaine. Making progress on other hot button issues, like abortion and guns, can seem impossible with a divided Congress, but Kaine says that's no reason to give up.  "We had a six-year-old bring a gun to class in Newport News, Virginia, and grievously injure a teacher there. So we're just seeing this too, too much. So we need to do more. It will be hard with the Republican House, no doubt about it. But, it wasn't easy last year and we found a breakthrough that we hadn't found for 25 years. So, there's no reason to give up," said Kaine.  The 64-year-old Democrat recently announced his plans to run for re-election in 2024. But he would not comment on whether it's time for President Biden to do the same.  "There's family, there's health, there's just all kinds of things you have to factor in. So, I would not give President Biden, or anyone, advice on how to make this very personal decision," said Kaine. 

China accuses US of indiscriminate use of force over balloon kostenlos streamen | dailyme

China accuses US of indiscriminate use of force over balloon

China on Monday accused the United States of indiscriminate use of force in shooting down a suspected Chinese spy balloon, saying it seriously impacted and damaged both sides efforts and progress in stabilizing Sino-U.S. relations.The U.S. shot down the balloon off the Carolina coast after it traversed sensitive military sites across North America. China insisted the flyover was an accident involving a civilian aircraft.Vice Foreign Minister Xie Feng said he lodged a formal complaint with the U.S. Embassy on Sunday over the U.S. attack on a Chinese civilian unmanned airship by military force.However, the United States turned a deaf ear and insisted on indiscriminate use of force against the civilian airship that was about to leave the United States airspace, obviously overreacted and seriously violated the spirit of international law and international practice, Xie said.The presence of the balloon in the skies above the U.S. dealt a severe blow to already strained U.S.-Chinese relations that have been in a downward spiral for years. It prompted Secretary of State Antony Blinken to abruptly cancel a high-stakes Beijing trip aimed at easing tensions.Xie repeated Chinas insistence that the balloon was a Chinese civil unmanned airship that blew into U.S. airspace by mistake, calling it an accidental incident caused by force majeure.China will resolutely safeguard the legitimate rights and interests of Chinese companies, resolutely safeguard Chinas interests and dignity and reserve the right to make further necessary responses, he said.U.S. President Joe Biden issued the shootdown order after he was advised that the best time for the operation would be when it was over water, U.S. officials said. Military officials determined that bringing down the balloon over land from an altitude of 60,000 feet would pose an undue risk to people on the ground.SEE MORE: Defense officials advised Biden not to shoot down Chinese balloonWhat the U.S. has done has seriously impacted and damaged both sides efforts and progress in stabilizing Sino-U.S. relations since the Bali meeting, Xie said, referring to a recent meeting between President Biden and his Chinese counterpart, Xi Jinping, in Indonesia that many hoped would create positive momentum for improving ties that have plunged to their lowest level in years.Foreign Ministry spokesperson Mao Ning provided no new details on Monday, repeating China's insistence that the object was a civilian balloon intended for meteorological research, had little ability to steer and entered U.S. airspace by accidentally diverging from its course. She also did not say what additional steps China intended to take in response to Washington's handling of the issue and cancellation of Blinken's trip, which would have made him the highest-ranking U.S. official to visit since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic.We have stated that this is completely an isolated and accidental incident caused by force majeure, but the U.S. still hyped up the incident on purpose and even used force to attack," Mao said at a daily briefing. This is an unacceptable and irresponsible action."Balloons thought or known to be Chinese have been spotted from Latin America to Japan. Japanese Deputy Chief Cabinet Secretary Yoshihiko Isozaki told reporters Monday that a flying object similar to the one shot down by the U.S. had been spotted at least twice over northern Japan since 2020.We are continuing to analyze them in connection with the latest case in the United States," he said.Mao confirmed that a balloon recently spotted over Latin American was Chinese, describing it as a civilian airship used for flight tests.Affected by weather and due to its limited self-control ability, the airship severely deviated from its set route and entered the space of Latin America and the Caribbean by accident, Mao said.Washington and Beijing are at odds over a range of issues from trade to human rights, but China is most sensitive over alleged violations by the U.S. and others of its sovereignty and territorial integrity.Beijing strongly protests U.S. military sales to Taiwan and visits by foreign politicians to the island, which it claims as Chinese territory, to be recovered by force if necessary.It reacted to a 2022 visit by then-U.S. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi by firing missiles over the island and staging threatening military drills seen as a rehearsal for an invasion or blockade. Beijing also cut off discussion with the U.S. on issues including climate change that are unrelated to military tensions.Last week, Mao warned Pelosis successor, House Speaker Kevin McCarthy, not to travel to Taiwan, implying that Chinas response would be equally vociferous.China will firmly defend its sovereignty, security and development interests, Mao said. McCarthy said China had no right to dictate where and when he could travel.SEE MORE: Lawmakers react to US shooting down suspected Chinese spy balloonChina

Mount Washington to reach wind chills of -100F, as cold as Mars kostenlos streamen | dailyme

Mount Washington to reach wind chills of -100F, as cold as Mars

Dangerous wind chills are expected this weekend for much of the Northeast as cold temperatures and gusty winds will create dangerous conditions.In one area that is notorious for its ferocious winds, the wind chill could reach 100 degrees below zero, according to the National Weather Service.Mount Washington, New Hampshire, sits 6,288 feet above sea level. According to Mount Washington Observatory, the average wind in February there is 45 mph.It is also very snowy there, averaging 566 inches of snow a year.The National Weather Service is projecting wind gusts on Mount Washington could reach 100 mph this weekend, while air temperatures drop to minus 45 degrees.Mount Washingtons observatory is staffed year-round, but staffers are warning others about the extreme cold.SEE MORE: Minus-60 wind chills expected for some states this weekendI want to emphasize the danger of this cold, wrote Mount Washington weather observer Alexis George. In these brutally cold conditions, the risk of hypothermia and frostbite will be exponential. These frigid cold conditions will quickly rob you of body heat, with the possibility that frostbite could develop on exposed skin in under a minute. Even small mistakes can prove deadly, with a simple slip or fogged goggles leading to a potentially life-threatening situation. In this type of weather, rescue services will have a difficult time responding to any emergency effectively.Such ferocious cold isn't terribly common  at least not on Earth.Located about 90 miles south of the Martian equator, the Mars Curiosity rover has recorded nighttime temperatures in recent days of 105 degrees below zero. The temperature during the day has climbed to as warm as 16 above zero, according to NASA.According to NASA, temperatures on Mars can be as cold as 225 degrees below zero and as warm as 70 degrees above zero.But its tricky to compare the wind chill on Mars to Earth.According to Arizona State University, winds on Mars can reach up to 62 mph, but because of Mars thin atmosphere, the wind has very little force.Surrounding towns in New England might not have wind chills as bad as Mount Washington, but the conditions will be nearly as dangerous. The National Weather Service is warning residents in New England and most of Upstate New York to prepare for wind chills reaching minus 60 degrees.Wind chill warnings are in place from northeast Pennsylvania north to the Maine/New Brunswick border. The wind chill warning includes Boston, which could have a minus 30 wind chill Saturday morning.

The US is facing a critical shortage of high tech engineers kostenlos streamen | dailyme

The US is facing a critical shortage of high tech engineers

In the heart of downtown Atlanta sits one of the nations fastest growing tech innovation hubs. Its called Tech Square and over 30 major tech companies have moved in. The eight-block stretch in midtown Atlanta is the southeasts highest density of research facilities, startups and corporate innovators.   "So Georgia Tech stands in amazing moment in time in the city of Atlanta. Atlanta is booming in terms of companies coming in and investments coming in. People from Asia are coming. Europe is here. South America is here," said Dr. Mitchell Walker, Associate Dean for Academic Affairs at Georgia Tech and a professor at the School of Aerospace Engineering.But why have the three biggest names in tech Apple, Google and Microsoft all set up shop in Atlanta in recent years? "When a company comes here, Georgia Tech is here and we are making engineers, we are making computer scientists, and they're all ready to go join these companies with the highest training in the world, either with a bachelor's and master's or a Ph.D. And they can get that talent local," Walker said. But even with schools like Georgia Tech being amongst the top producers of engineers in America, it is projected that between 2016-2024 America will be over six million short of the number of engineers needed to keep up with our increasingly tech-savvy lifestyles, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.In a recent panel on the future of microelectronics at Purdue University, U.S. Secretary of Commerce Gina Raimondo expresses her concerns. "And every company you talk to, literally everyone, including the ones in the booths, will tell you the thing they're most worried about is talent. The rate limiting factor to growth is talent. And by the way, it's at every level, right? Process engineers, technicians, to the Ph.D. [in] physics and the like," Raimondo said. Whats behind the shortage? The country has experienced a growing disinterest in STEM over the years. Now the government, academic institutions and companies are banking on making science and engineering cool again.  SEE MORE: Google axes 12,000 jobs, layoffs spread across tech sectorKevin Lavallee, CEO of TKE Elevator North America, is looking to fill STEM positions.SCRIPPS NEWS' STEPHEN GRADDICK: You're looking to fill almost 900 positions, yes? What's your strategy for that?KEVIN LAVALLEE: And our thoughts here are that if you're an engineer or you're coming from the science and or manufacturing technology, pretty exciting place to be. You know, you have everything available here. You have the training, you have corporate headquarters already. Relocating gives you lots of opportunity, if the elevator industry wasn't for you, but we're pretty sure it will be.TKE is a global leader in the elevator space. Just last year, they opened the North America headquarters in Atlanta. The company employs over 50,000 people worldwide and plans to recruit talent from the pool of engineers in the area.  With more companies like TKE flooding the Atlanta job market with open positions, first year students like Raymond Doe say that there is a sea of options to choose from. "It's a very competitive market. My major, biomedical engineering, is one of the newer aspects of the medical field. So steadily growing occupation. And what I love about Georgia Tech is the we have boundless opportunities to get, you know, co-ops, internships," Doe said. "When our students walk across the stage, 86% of them have at least one job or offer in hand, and their starting salary is on average $88,000. The average for the country is only $58,000," Walker said. Dr. Walker says theres an unlocked potential in groups that have often been overlooked in the STEM fields.  "We create the most female engineers in the country. We award degrees to the most underrepresented student groups in the country," he said.But the future of engineering in America is on the line. A more diverse group is needed and Atlantas tech mecca hopes to meet that need. 

Tyre Nichols video: Here are some of the key takeaways kostenlos streamen | dailyme

Tyre Nichols video: Here are some of the key takeaways

Friday evening, the City of Memphis released the hard-to-watch brutal beating video of 29- year-old Tyre Nichols.Police say it started as a traffic stop for reckless driving; Although Police Chief Cerelyn Davis says they haven't yet found video that substantiates what officers reported.Now, some Tennessee lawmakers are questioning the effectiveness of random stops and de-escalation training."If you don't get to the escalation part, ain't nothing to de-escalate," said Rep. G.A. Hardaway.There were four videos released by the department totaling over an hour of footage.One video clip from a police body camera shows officers already in an aggressive mode as a third officer arrives on scene.They yank the father-of-one out of his car as they spout profanities and threats.Nichols appears to be complying, responding to shouted commands with "alright," and pointing out to officers that he's already on the ground.As officers continue to shout around him, one officer tases Nichols, but Nichols is able to break free and runs away; police immediately chase him and call for backup.Another video angle shows the moments after officers caught up to Nichols, they're on top of Nichols, kicking him in the face, pepper spraying him and punching him with haymakers a term one of the officers later proudly proclaimed he had done to Nichols while laughing with fellow officers on the scene.A "haymaker" is a punch delivered with great force.SEE MORE: Memphis authorities release video of officers beating Tyre NicholsAt one point, one of the officers retracts his baton telling Nichols he's going to "baton the f*** out of you," and another police officer is heard cheering him on on video saying "hit him, hit him."At points in the video, you can hear Nichols yelling loudly for his mother as he's on the ground.Nichols seemed to be trying to get home; he was living with his parents and the house was a short distance away from the scene.His mother hasn't watched the video but spoke about hearing that her son called out for her."For me to find out that my son was calling my name and I was only feets away. I did not even hear him. You have no clue how I feel right now. No clue," said RowVaughn Wells, Tyre's mother.At one point, more people get to the scene; It's unclear if they're MPD or another agency.Nichols was then handcuffed and on the ground. Defenseless.There were approximately 7 people on scene as they dragged Tyre Nichols' body up against a police car. He's alive, but badly injured.Emergency crews eventually worked on Nichols, then loaded him into an ambulance to take him to the hospital, where 3 days later he died.You can hear officers checking to make sure each other are okay.Officer: I'm not talking about straight like that. I'm asking, are y'all injured?Several people replied: Nah, I'm good. I'm good.When the police department originally sent out a statement about this case, they never mentioned that Nichols was beaten.Now, two Shelby County deputies and two fire department employees in Memphis have all been put on leave as this video continues to be investigated.

Report: Americans lost $40B to phishing scams in 2022 kostenlos streamen | dailyme

Report: Americans lost $40B to phishing scams in 2022

We're getting our first look at just how much money Americans lost to phishing scams  those phony texts or calls or even Internet ads that try to get money or information out of you.A report by TrueCaller, an app that blocks spam calls, estimates Americans lost $40 billion in 2022 to phishing scams."It continues to be the number one issue. It is the primary access point for 99% of these attacks," said Robert Falzon, head of engineering at Checkpoint Security, an international Cybersecurity company with locations in more than 10 countries. "[2023] is going to be the year where we see a lot of these. It's just January and I'm fielding calls like crazy."We often associate phishing with money, and that $40 billion offers credence to that point. But Falzon points out scammers are now looking beyond quick tricks that will net them a few hundred dollars to elaborate frauds that can cost people tens of thousands of dollars.SEE MORE: Top Scams Of 2022 You Need To Know About"Medical records are worth more than a working credit card nowadays,"said Falzon. "Hackers want to be able to do the long game with you. They want to know about your parent or grandparent that might be suffering from some cognitive disorder, and then they're going to find that information out and sell that medical record to someone who will exploit that person far beyond a simple, quick scam on the phone."The report by TrueCaller shows more Americans are falling prey to these scams, even as awareness of them rises. It says 68 million Americans fell prey to phishing scams last year, which is up from 59.4 million in 2021 and 56 million in 2020.It's why Falzon says to approach inquiries about any of your information with healthy scrutiny, and not just your financial data. He says with technology like ChatGPT, where AI produces messages, scammers can sound more natural and relatable.So, ask questions. If it is a legitimate source, Falzon says, you will not be scrutinized for authenticating validity. Also, do your homework. If you get a call saying you owe a medical debt, Falzon suggests calling your insurance company to verify that's true, and then call the credit agency back.It is a few extra steps, but ones that can keep you, your money, and your information safe.

Operation Santa: How You And The USPS Can Help People In Need kostenlos streamen | dailyme

Operation Santa: How You And The USPS Can Help People In Need

Want to give Santa a helping hand this Christmas? Here's how:It "began way back in 1912. We've been doing this long time," said Mark Inglett, Strategic Communications Specialist at the United States Postal Service.We're talking about Operation Santa, a USPS staple for well over 100 years."The letters are pouring in, and we're gonna get a chance to go online. Look at some of the things kids are needing. It could be simple stuff, a bicycle or some clothes or some socks or anything. You'd be surprised what you can do to help people out for the holidays," said Inglett.Operation Santa has helped deliver gifts from Ol' Saint Nick to kids of all ages. And over the years, the process has moved online."It gives you simple steps on how you can adopt the family. Purchase what they're asking for. Go to the Postal Service, you're going to mail from the post office, and then that way they get it from Santa Claus," said Inglett.SEE MORE: Naughty Or Nice: Potential Santa Shortage This Christmas SeasonInglett says kids of all ages can write Santa a letter. "You'd be surprised at some of the bigger kids that write in are hurting a little bit too, and they state what's going on in their lives and we can help those folks as well," said Inglett.Operation Santa is just one of so many different programs and organizations helping people during the holidays.But Inglett says there is just something special about being able to give back, no matter what is going on in the world."That one sense of normalcy, that one sense of everything's gonna be okay, is when they see that letter carrier, that postal truck coming through the neighborhood, because we are so important to the communities," said Inglett.There are a few really important deadlines to take note of. If you need a little extra love this year, you can start writing letters to Santa starting November 28 with a December 12 deadline. If you want to help Santa make this year awesome, you have until December 19 to adopt a family, shop, and send the gifts off.

How Can Earth Avoid An Asteroid Strike? kostenlos streamen | dailyme

How Can Earth Avoid An Asteroid Strike?

Sixty-six million years ago, a six-mile-wide asteroid slammed into whats now the Yucatan peninsula at 40,000 miles per hour. The impact ignited wildfires across the world, created global tsunamis, and caused the extinction of three quarters of earths species including the dinosaurs.Now, most space objects burn up in the atmosphere and a few dozen tiny meteorites strike the earth every day.It was a normal Friday morning in Chelyabinsk, Russia, in 2013, and then a meteorite that was about 50-feet a cross blew up in a fireball mid-air. The aftermath resulted in thousands of injuries, broken windows, and chaos in three cities over 200 square miles.It's a reminder of the dangers lurking in our solar system. Hollywood has depicted the risks of space rocks in films like "Don't Look Up" in 2021. But how real is the threat? Space is mostly unbelievably empty.But occasionally a wayward rock what scientists call near Earth objects passes through our neck of the woods. Most are asteroids and a few are cometsOn the moon, impacts from both over billions of years have left more than 100,000 craters. Venus and Mars have weathered their share of bombardment, but the sky above Earth offers some protection. When a piece of an asteroid or comet enters the atmosphere, it's called a meteor. Many are visible as shooting stars before they burn up completely. Most are smaller than a grain of sand. If a car-sized rock were to head our way, the Planetary Society estimates, the atmosphere would burn it up to the size of a microwave.If a meteor actually hits Earth, it's called a meteorite. As many as 30 pebble sized ones strike the planet each day at an average speed of 12-miles-a-second. Meteorites the size of a house strike every few centuries. Every million years or so a mountain sized one makes an impact like the 6-mile-wide rock that blasted Earth with the force of one hundred trillion tons of TNT, killing the dinosaurs 66 million years ago.SEE MORE: NASA Details Historic DART Mission That Crashed Into AsteroidTelescopes on the ground and in orbit monitor near Earth objects, and authorities track more than 30,000 of them.A third are bigger than 460 feet across, considered by NASA to be large enough to threaten the planet. Astronomers say no large asteroids are on course to strike earth for at least 100 years.Like 1,200-foot-wide Apophis, set to pass within 19,000 miles of Earth in 2036, but the agency acknowledges blind spots are hiding some 15,000 near Earth objects.  Sky surveys can miss asteroids with unusual orbits and the sun can obscure big rocks. In 2020, a car-sized asteroid called 2020 QG zoomed only 2,000 miles from Earths surface. Astronomers didnt detect it until hours before it zoomed by at 11 miles per second.Engineers are preparing to act if a deadly asteroid is one day headed for Earth.In September, after a 10-month journey, NASAs double asteroid redirection test, or dart, blasted directly towards a 560-foot-wide asteroid. The goal was to see if a direct hit would change the rocks trajectory.A second spacecraft nearby recorded the hit, helping confirm that the spacecraft had nudged the rock slightly off course.While Dimorphos posed no risk to Earth, engineers say the test shows future missions could theoretically divert killer asteroids safely away from Earth. Hollywood will probably continue imagining the possibilities, while planetary defenders will keep their eyes on the skies making the universe just a little less dangerous than before.

Colorado Springs Mass Shooting Suspect May Have Been Known To Police kostenlos streamen | dailyme

Colorado Springs Mass Shooting Suspect May Have Been Known To Police

One of the biggest questions about the tragic shooting in Colorado Springs, Colorado, is the extent to which the suspect wasor was noton the radar of local and federal law enforcement officials before the attack.So far, police have not released many details about the suspect, 22-year-old Anderson Lee Aldrich.The Colorado Springs Police Chief Adrian Vasquez, says he entered Club Q just before midnight heavily armed"At least two firearms were found at the scene. We are still working to identify the firearms and who they belong to, but I can confirm the suspect used a long rifle during the shooting," said Vasquez.Investigators are now trying to determine if all of those weapons belonged to the suspect, and if so, how did he get them?They will also be scouring any social media profiles, phones and computers, searching for clues and a possible motive.Club Q is already calling this a "hate attack" but by Sunday night there were new questions about the suspects previous interactions with police.SEE MORE: Colorado Patrons Stop Gunman Who Killed At Least 5 At LGBTQ+ NightclubIn June of last year, a man with the same name and matching age was arrested near Colorado Springs on charges of felony menacing and kidnapping. His mother called the police to say her son was threatening her with a bomb, multiple weapons, and ammunition. There was a police standoff before the suspect surrendered, but it appears the local District Attorneys Office, led by Michael Allen, did not press charges. The Colorado Springs Gazette reports the case was dismissed and is now sealed.When Newsy asked the District Attorney about the 2021 case, spokesman Howard Black would only say that the earlier case is part of the current investigation.Colorado is also one of nineteen states with a so-called red flag or extreme risk law that allows judges to confiscate guns from people with a history of mental illness or violence.It is not clear if any family members, police, or the District Attorney ever filed any petitions against the suspect. According to Colorado Bureau of Investigation records obtained by Newsy, the suspect does not appear to have a criminal record.The FBI has not responded to questions from Newsy about whether they were aware of the suspect before the shooting.

Why Do We Use Different Words For Soft Drinks? kostenlos streamen | dailyme

Why Do We Use Different Words For Soft Drinks?

The refreshing taste of a cold glass of soda, pop or coke. They are all common names for that sweet carbonated beverage. But why do we have so many names for the same drink? Lets sip on it. The term "soda" derives from sodium. Thats because there are sodium salts in carbonated water which is the foundation for modern-day soda. The origins behind the term pop are a bit fuzzy. The first account may come from English poet Robert Southey. In 1812 he wrote a letter to his wife telling her about a drink "called pop, because pop goes the cork when it is drawn, and pop you would go off if you drank too much of it." The term "coke" is short for "Coca-Cola" the first glass was sold in 1886 in Atlanta. And the shortened version of its name soon became synonymous for any soft drink. According to data from popvssoda.com, soda is the favorite term for the northeast, most of Florida, California and some parts of the midwest. In most of the midwest and west, "pop" is most popular. And in the south, "Coke" is what youll hear most even when its not Coca-Cola. Faygo beverages company, headquartered in Detroit, started marketing its soft drink as "pop" in the early 1900s. That could explain why that term is still the favorite in the midwest. Coca-Cola has been headquartered in Atlanta for over 130 years, which explains why the term "coke" dominates down south. A few other terms still get some play, including "tonic." A number of people in Massachusetts still say "tonic" when they want to order soda, pop or coke whatever you call it, cheers. SEE MORE: Pepsi And IHOP Partner To Release Limited Edition Maple Syrup Cola

TikTok Has Been Hiring Former CIA, FBI, And NSA Officers kostenlos streamen | dailyme

TikTok Has Been Hiring Former CIA, FBI, And NSA Officers

The U.S. intelligence community sees China as its top threat. But Americans who have left intelligence agencies are getting jobs at TikTok, which is owned by Chinese company ByteDance. Larry Pfeiffer is the former chief of staff for the Central Intelligence Agency.   "I was definitely concerned or maybe borderline alarmed," said Pfeiffer. Newsy showed Pfeiffer how we found at least three former CIA officers who later went to work at TikTok. At least another three former longtime FBI employees, a crisis management unit chief and supervisory special agents also went to TikTok. There's plenty more in public view. A government website confirmed that an NSA target analyst "landed a job at TikTok." Other staff have backgrounds in the U.S. Cyber Command, Pacific Command, and State Department. They generally work in TikTok investigations, threat analysis, and law enforcement outreach. Lindsay Gorman was the former senior adviser for technology strategy for the White House. Until April, he advised the White House on tech competition between the U.S. and China. She said these hires give TikTok a stamp of legitimacy. "On the one hand, this is a normal reaction to a growth of a company. As social media companies have scaled, they've hired threat intelligence analysts Google, Facebook, Twitter have all done that. And a popular talent pool for these companies is former law enforcement and intelligence officials," Gorman said. "On the other hand, though, we can't ignore the fact that these concerns about TikTok's Chinese parent ownership have not been resolved."She said the lines between business and government get blurred in China, in part because of Beijing's national intelligence law, which compels citizens and businesses to share information with state intelligence-gathering efforts, if asked.   SEE MORE: TikTok, Other Social Companies Address Data Privacy Before Congress"The ultimate question is, is this a strategic decision on the part of TikTok, ByteDance or God help us, the Chinese government you know, is there instruction out there, 'go hire these people in order to help us influence this negativity we're hearing from the U.S. government about our platform so we can then use this platform to then exploit and get information that we want to get about Americans?'" said Pfeiffer.  Former senior intelligence officials told Newsy their colleagues could become unwitting accomplices to China's intelligence services. Their old skills, like mapping networks of terrorists, could potentially be used to target China's critics and opponents. This comes after a researcher said TikTok can track every keystroke that users make. "It's absolutely possible that TikTok or its parent company, ByteDance, could be monitoring and collecting keystroke and other data from their former U.S. intelligence employees and then learning how they do their jobs. Could it be done more subtly through investigations of the employee's backgrounds, through idle chit-chat in the office? Any of the classic ways in which an intelligence service can get information from individuals," said Pfeiffer. A TikTok spokesperson told Newsy, "that's a fantastical and unsubstantiated hypothesis," and downplayed ties to China. The spokesperson also said the platform would be irresponsible not to hire people with expertise in issues like counterterrorism and covert influence.  But fears persist that the private data of U.S.-based TikTok users their search histories, biometrics, interests, and vulnerabilities can be accessed and exploited in Beijing.    Buzzfeed reported that China-based engineers have accessed U.S. users' private data, multiple times. Forbes reported that TikTok parent company ByteDance "planned to use the TikTok app to monitor the personal location of some specific American citizens."   To defend the company, a TikTok executive invoked the CIA. SEE MORE: Why Is TikTok Under Scrutiny Again?"As actual national security agencies like the CIA during the Trump administration pointed out, the data that's available on TikTok, because it's an entertainment app, is not of national security importance," said Michael Beckerman,  the head of Tiktok Americas.Numerous government agencies don't allow TikTok on their employees' devices. And the FBI is sounding alarms on the Chinese government's activities in the U.S."When I last looked, we were opening a new China counterintelligence investigation about every 12 hours. And it's about a 1300% increase from several years ago," said Chris Wray, the FBI director. Three national security lawyers told Newsy that just taking a job at TikTok after government work isn't

Why Does Intergenerational Trauma Affect Us? kostenlos streamen | dailyme

Why Does Intergenerational Trauma Affect Us?

We can't change the past, but the past can change us for generations. "To realize the capability of humanity to turn into the most vicious creatures on this Earth; We have that built in to us," said Bill Kugelman, a Holocaust survivor.  Kugeleman is 98-years old, but he vividly remembers life as a teenager in Poland when Nazis tore him from his home and condemned him to the concentration camps. He used to smoke dried leaves to tame ravaging hunger and grew numb from the beatings and the fear. He believed he'd never see freedom again. "You just did not react to things anymore. It's just like you beat the dead horse. That was it," said Kugelman. He says even 80 years later, he can't bring himself to give a full description of life and death in the concentration camps. And to those closest to that kind of pain, it's their history, too even if they didn't live it. Dr. Irit Felsen is a psychologist who specializes in holocaust-related trauma and knows this subject on a deeper level. "Children of trauma survivors have an experiential knowledge of their parents trauma of experiences that they never actually lived through," said Felsen. Both her parents were survivors, making her a 2G or 2nd generation survivor. She says children of survivors can react to their parent's anxiety and depression. "Being hyper vigilant about all kinds of things all the time, be a little suspicious; mistrustful illness, anxiety and a tendency to sort of depressive experiences," said Felsen. SEE MORE: How The Aftermath Of Natural Disasters Affects Mental HealthThis is called "intergenerational trauma" which means a survivor was impacted so greatly. Their descendants also grapple with the effects of a traumatizing event. According to the American Psychological Association, people who experience intergenerational trauma may show emotional or behavioral patterns similar to the survivor, such as: shame, increased anxiety, guilt, low self-esteem, and depression.Even substance abuse and difficulty creating relationships with others and so much more. While intergenerational trauma was first identified among children of holocaust survivors it isn't specific to one culture. Take Brought Plenty, an indigenous woman and boarding school survivor who says she remembers the moments federal U.S. officials forcibly took her from her grandparents and sent her to a boarding school designed to erase her language, culture and beliefs.  "She just grabbed my hair on one side, my braids, and just cut it off and threw it right at me and then went to the other side and cut it off," said Plenty. She was just six-and-a-half years old and never saw her grandparents again. Now, at 70, Plenty recalls how she was forced to forget her name, bathed in soap that smelled like lye, and suffered physical abuse at the hands of other students and staff.  She says her daughter Nellia Faradi now bears the consequences of that trauma.  "I can honestly say with my older children, I never hugged. I never kissed them. You know, I never told them I was proud of them," said Plenty. Psychologist Fabiana Franco is among a chorus of researchers who say difficulty expressing love or emotions can affect a child's sense of self-worth, which they then pass on to their own children later in life.  Nellia's trauma manifests as guilt as she helps her mother find missing children who never came home from boarding school."I have a breakdown at least once a month because, you know, I'm reading all of these testimonies and then I feel bad because I'm like, well, I should be able to read this if other people live through it. But at the same time, it's like, you know, you can't carry hundreds of people's stories," said Faradi. While researchers have widely documented the effects of intergenerational trauma, there's no conclusive finding about how it's passed on. SEE MORE: Where Is Mental Health Funding Going?Researcher Yael Danieli believes survivors may struggle to form healthy bonds and emotional attachments to their children, which can create a cycle of avoidant and distrustful relationships. But one 2015 study by Dr. Rachel Yehuda at Mount Sinai hospital found genetic changes to Holocaust survivors' descendants specifically focused on the gene associated with stress hormones.  This theory is known as "epigenetic inheritance" the thought that environmental factors, like stress or diet, can affect your descendant's gene expression. In a 2008 lecture Dr. Joy DeGruy author of Post Traumatic Stress Syndrome: America's Legacy of Enduring Injury and Healing, called this effect in the black community "post-traumatic slave syndrome.""Hundreds of years of

Some Matlacha Island Homes Are Sinking After Hurricane Ian kostenlos streamen | dailyme

Some Matlacha Island Homes Are Sinking After Hurricane Ian

Jane and Paul Ott, who own a house in Matlacha, say they are in total disbelief. "It's no longer my paradise. This was a dream home," Jane said. "It's just heartbreaking "The vacation waterfront house they bought over a year ago suffered major damage from Hurricane Ian's devastating storm surge."He let me cry for about ten minutes and then it was, 'Well it's not going to change so put your gloves on, put your mask on and start hulling stuff out,'" Jane continued.The couple's home was among many structures that were battered in Matlacha, a small island of about 600 people at the foot of Pine Island, which was also devastated by Ian. "Look up down the street. I've never seen destruction like this," Jane said. The couple and other residents say their homes and businesses are crumbling at a rapid pace into the bay.The storm surge damaged some of the older sea walls that protect the buildings' foundations, causing erosion beneath the structures.Most of the cottages on the island were built in the 1940s and 1950s, so they don't comply with newer construction regulations, like a newer property that had to be elevated a couple of feet above ground. SEE MORE: Floridians Are Missing The Little Things As Recovery Efforts ContinueMeanwhile, chaos ensues on the only roadway access to Matlacha, while crews work on repaving the road. The trip normally takes 10-15 minutes from Cape Coral. It took Newsy two and half hours to get onto Matlacha.What used to be homes and businesses are now reduced to piles of ruble. "Just looking up and down the street is kind of depressing. Just all the stuff," Jane said.The floodwaters also made it to Johnny Glisson's home of 15 years. "It has three to four inches of mud from the front to the back," Matlacha resident Johnny Glisson said.He lost all of his belongings. The 74-year-old says he almost didn't make it off the community. "When I felt it wasn't going to turn, I grabbed the most important things in my life, which was my guitar and my Bible. So, I took off with that," he said.Most of Matlacha's property owners are retired folks, commercial fishermen and others who use their houses as vacation homes.Matlacha is in Lee County, the region with the highest number of deaths in Florida from the storm. "Sometimes you just don't know where to start," Paul said.As for Jane and Paul Ott, their cleaning continues. They say there's hope. They dream of rebuilding their home, the house they bought through years of hard work. 

Drone Wars: Ukraine Faces Russian 'Flying Lawnmowers of Death' kostenlos streamen | dailyme

Drone Wars: Ukraine Faces Russian 'Flying Lawnmowers of Death'

Ukrainians refer to the newest Russian weapon on the battlefield  and the sound they make  as "flying lawnmowers of death."This video captures the deadly addition to Putin's arsenal of long-range weaponry: the Iranian Shahed-136 kamikaze drone, used by Russia as part of the deadly attack on civilian targets across Ukraine. "We're dealing with terrorists, dozens of rockets, Iranian drones hitting the energy facilities all over the country," said Ukrainian president Volodymyr Zelenskyy.Ukrainian officials say in Monday's attack Russia launched more than a dozen kamikaze drones in a matter of hours. Ukraine was only able to shoot down half of them. They've been spotted in the skies over Ukrainian cities, including over Odesa, although Iran denies it and Russia won't confirm the use of the deadly drones. "We know that U.S. intelligence has estimated a transfer of several hundred of these drones to Russia," said Samuel Bendett, an adviser at the Center for New American Security. "Because these drones can fly at well over 200 to 300 kilometers, they were basically used as a cheap weapon, a cheap terror weapon to strike Ukrainian infrastructure across the country."  They're cheaper for Russia than cruise missiles, each of which cost millions of dollars. Putin's military is using the drones primarily to terrorize civilians far from the front lines. SEE MORE: Russia Prepares To Annex 4 Occupied Regions Of Ukraine"If they can sneak past the air defenses or electronic warfare pockets, they can basically strike with impunity. And this is a message sent to the defending side that they are not safe because these drones can penetrate the airspace, they can penetrate defenses and strike at will," said Bendett. "They can strike civilian targets, they can strike infrastructure targets, they can target Ukrainian warehouses, command and control, logistics and communications and cause the same amount of damage that was caused in Russia's own rear in their own region when the Ukrainians launched multiple strikes to affect Russian logistics."Though Shahed-class drones aren't as accurate and carry a fraction of the explosive power of a missile, they still pack a punch  as seen in an attack last month on a municipal building in Odesa. Comparatively low-tech, and low and slow flying, these drones are vulnerable to small arms fire and Ukrainian aerial defense systems. Ukraine's military has released images showing the remnants of drones shot out of the sky. The problem for Ukraine is that the Shaheds usually attack in swarms. "This is their main tactic to overwhelm so that at least one or two can sneak past and strike the target," said Bendett. For the first part of the war, Ukraine's Turkish Bayrkatar drones dominated the battlefield, even inspiring this patriotic song. But then came the more menacing Iranian drones. They're not going to be a game changer, but they can cause significant pain and suffering for the defending side.

Migrant Workers Helping To Rebuild After Ian Face Scams, Fraud kostenlos streamen | dailyme

Migrant Workers Helping To Rebuild After Ian Face Scams, Fraud

It's been nearly two weeks since Hurricane Ian made landfall in Florida. And as towns hit hard by the storm start to rebuild, messages advertising repair jobs have been popping up across Whatsapp groups and online platforms."Some people sent her a text about work here. We just came here and we're here now working," said Ansony Javiel, a Venezuelan migrant. Javiel is only two days into his job near Fort Myers. NEWSY'S AXEL TURCIOS: What type of work do they have you doing? ANSONY JAVIEL: Demolition, packing the garbage. TURCIOS: At homes? JAVIEL: Yes, at homes.  He arrived from Dallas along with other Venezuelan migrants looking to work in the reconstruction of southwest Florida. Javiel is seeking asylum in the U.S. after he crossed the Mexico-U.S. border two weeks ago.  JAVIEL: You see all sorts of things on the journey, dead people. It's tough. TURCIOS: Was it worth it? JAVIEL: Yes, it was worth it. Experts say dozens and even thousands of migrants will be arriving in the state to help repair properties, putting their lives in danger for little pay. SEE MORE: Found Cleaning Up After Hurricane Ian: A Stranger's MemoriesFernando Zucato is the owner of a roof tarp company. He said he's seen the advertisements targeting recently arrived migrants, people who are prone to exploitation, scams and no pay. "Some companies, yes, they're going to take advantage. They hire the guys for three weeks, checks never come," said Zucato. Zucato says these people become victims of misinformation because their need for urgent jobs makes them fall for almost anything. "I heard so many stories that they threaten people. If you try to do anything bad to me, I'm going to call immigration on you," said Zucato.  Jesus Duran is also from Venezuela. He made his way to Florida to work on rebuilding the destroyed areas. TURCIOS: You've been working for two days now, it's hard work. You're going to be working for several days possibly. Are you afraid that they might not be trustworthy? JESUS DURAN: Sure, of course. Because you must work because you need to, otherwise you won't work. They must pay me. They should pay me, right? TURCIOS: How much are you getting paid? DURAN: $17 an hour and overtime $25.50. Immigrants from Mexico, Honduras and Guatemala have historically been the backbone of the recovery workforce in regions slammed by natural disasters.   This time the new waves of migrants are comprised of Venezuelans, Cubans and people from Central America. The same migrants are being bussed and flown to sanctuary states in the northeast from Texas by Florida's Governor Ron DeSantis. While the governor has not spoken about these migrants coming to work in Florida, he encouraged companies in the state to hire locally. 

Changing Your Password Too Often Might Be Hurting Your Account Privacy kostenlos streamen | dailyme

Changing Your Password Too Often Might Be Hurting Your Account Privacy

Microsoft recently advised against longstanding, conventional cybersecurity logic on required password changes. It turns out forced switches made users select more predictable and easy-to-breach passwords."The pattern that humans use, particularly when they're not using a password manager, is they come up with, sort of, this rubric," said Pedro Canahuati, chief technology officer at 1Password. "If that's really very complex, it makes it difficult for people to gain access to it. But the reality is, humans are not good at randomness.""The previous advice for people to rotate their passwords so frequently led to some really bad habits: people writing passwords down, only changing maybe the last digit," said Lisa Plaggemier, executive director of the National Cybersecurity Alliance."Changing that one character at the end of your password is not enough when you're up against a bot who's just cycling away at different passwords and switching out letters and numbers."SEE MORE: Experts: Social Platforms Are Unprepared For Election MisinformationHumans are notoriously bad at passwords. NordPass' research of commonly used passwords across 50 countries in 2021 found the most popular were strings of letters or numbers, like 123456 and qwerty or words like password. Most could be cracked in less than one second.Still, if you search online for advice on how often you should change passwords, you'll still find a lot of results saying you should change them routinely.Newsy spoke to four cybersecurity experts about best rotation practices. While all noted that there are times when passwords should be changed like when your data is implicated in a breach there are other, more important security features that can be used to strengthen data protection."People just need to understand that passwords only go so far, and you need multifactor authentication," said Ed Skoudis, president of SANS Technology Institute. "Password management organizations also have an obligation to keep their users secure and safe.""The simple solution at the end of the day is to use strong and unique passwords with a password manager because nobody can create them as strong as they can with the password manager," said Craig Lurey, chief technology officer at Keeper Security. "This is hundreds of engineers, solely focused on protecting passwords in an encrypted vault that's highly secure and protected from access, and all the years of implementation that went into that versus whatever you think you can do with your notepad."

Exclusive: FBI Agents In The U.S. Report Symptoms Of Mystery Syndrome kostenlos streamen | dailyme

Exclusive: FBI Agents In The U.S. Report Symptoms Of Mystery Syndrome

The issue first made headlines after American diplomats and spies in Havana experienced puzzling brain injury symptoms in 2016, including dizziness, headaches and memory loss. The government calls this mysterious syndrome "Anomalous Health Incidents." Newsy has new, exclusive details that FBI agents are also reporting these symptoms on U.S. soil.SEE MORE: U.S. May Have Suspected 'No Trace' Weapon Against Spies Decades AgoProminent national security attorney Mark Zaid represents current and former FBI personnel. He says a dozen or more incidents have been reported in Washington, D.C. and in Florida, mainly out of the bureau's Miami field office.  "There have been double digit members of the FBI, employees of the FBI, who have been injured in multiple locations inside the United States," Zaid said. "These are cases that have been brought to the attention not only of the FBI, but also the CIA and the DNI and folks on the Hill. These have not been really publicized in any way. In fact, the reality is domestic incidents are being downplayed, if not outright ignored, by the U.S. government."Zaid says the incidents have mostly occurred within the last four years. The common thread he's seen in victims across multiple agencies is work related to Russia. "The AHI investigation is like an iceberg," Zaid said. "We only see the top one-third. Most of it is beneath the surface. I've seen beneath the surface, but even I have only seen a little bit beneath the surface."Just this winter, the CIA assessed that most reports were explained by medical or environmental conditions, not a foreign adversary. But the agency still couldnt rule out a nation-state in a subset of cases.The attorneys requests for FBI records under the Freedom of Information Act have so far led to nothing. A recent letter described B7A exemptions, which withhold documents pending a criminal investigation.When Newsy described the incidents to the FBI, the bureau said the issue is a top priority and that the FBI takes all U.S. government personnel who report symptoms seriously, including messaging its workforce about how to respond if they experience an incident and where they can receive medical evaluations.Zaid is also trying to get a 150-page report from the Office of the Director of National Intelligence, which he says theyre suddenly calling a draft.  He believes the CIA is wary of this report going public because it contradicts the agency. It hews more closely to a National Academy of Sciences report that finds pulsed electromagnetic energy the most plausible cause.

Schools Face Massive Teacher Shortages kostenlos streamen | dailyme

Schools Face Massive Teacher Shortages

Teaching was a stressful job before COVID turned all of our lives upside down. Now it's even more stressful. "For a really long time, the to do list in education has been growing more and more demanding over time. And as soon as COVID hit, that entire to-do list was kind of like thrown into the waste basket," said Rebecca Rogers, a content creator and former teacher. In January, the National Education Association, the country's largest union, polled over 3,000 of its members.  Over half, 55%, said they were more than likely to leave or retire from teaching earlier than expected due to the pandemic.  That's almost double the number from 2 years ago.  "'Here are all these new things we need you to do instead.' And then as soon as school came back, instead of picking and choosing the most necessary items on each to do list, they're like 'okay, here's both todo lists, both of which were already pretty unmanageable for one person, have fun!'" said Rogers. Teacher burnout from the pandemic goes hand in hand with the teacher shortages. But the shortage is not new. The NEA has been tracking the trend for the last two decades.  "The reality is that not only have we had an educator shortage for a while, but the pandemic, just like everything else, worsened it. We have educators who are under more stress with less resources. More is being asked of them than ever before," said Becky Pringle, the president of the National Education Association.  Nicole Lawson is the chief human resources officer at Atlanta Public Schools. "They are expressing the need to alleviate the burnout. And the burnout comes with the amount of planning it takes to plan for this new way of teaching. Teachers are experiencing double loads so if there's a shortage that means they're taking on additional students. Compound that with planning, it feels like you can't do enough," said Lawson.  According to a Rand survey, teachers are nearly three times more likely to report symptoms of depression than other adults.  For Rebeca Rogers, leaving the classroom came down to being overworked while the administration consistently asked her to do more.  "It was so demeaning on my mental health. During online learning I was doing 18 hours a day trying to make these animated content videos for kids and it didn't matter how much extra I was doing it was almost like expected, and no matter what I did it wasn't enough, but my mental health just couldn't take it. When I left there were 3000 vacancies in the county," said Rogers.   But it's not just that teachers are leaving the classroom. Districts are also struggling because there aren't enough students who are even pursuing the career. "We have been extremely concerned that we have seen the decline in the number of our college students who are choosing to go into the profession. And then the number of our new educators who are going into the profession leaving the profession in those first 5 years. So this is something we've been following and working to address through policy and funding and training and just encouraging people to go into teaching," said Pringle.   Unfilled job openings lead to more work and stress for those who are still in the schools.   According to the NEA, caseloads for counselors and social workers have grown dramatically, just like the demands on teachers. And that has a direct link to students. Many need more support due to the pandemic. "They have to take care of themselves first so they can take care of their students. And like so many adults in the system right now they are struggling to find those additional resources and finding the time to do it. If our teachers are not doing well then our students aren't going to do well," said Pringle. The NEA says the bottom line is clear teachers are not OK. Burnout and shortages are the biggest problems that need attention. "We are working together with educators all over the country and with mental health experts to provide educators with places to go and resources to support their colleagues and their schools and the entire community so that we can all heal together and help each other to do just that," said Pringle.  

Complaints, Scams Rising In The High-Priced Consumer Market kostenlos streamen | dailyme

Complaints, Scams Rising In The High-Priced Consumer Market

Between soaring prices and low stock, consumers have been through a lot over the past couple years."Its just becoming a tough market, real estate wise, auto wise, and with interest rates going up, its just going to continue to get tough for us all really," said Robert Blount, a car shopper. Nowhere is this more evident than the auto industry. In fact, auto sales and repairs were the number one category of complaints for 2021.The Consumer Federation of America says the car industry has taken the top spot for six years now, adding, "It is clear that auto sales and repairs are a longstanding problem.The nations hot housing market and tight rental scene also led to lots of complaints."He told me to get gift cards," said Joseph Veras, a housing scam victim. "He wanted me to send the money. He told me to take a picture of the front and the back of the card and the receipt and send it to him. In south Florida, Veras sent a phony landlord $4,000 to secure a three-bedroom, two bath home for rent. His interpreter tried to help."I called the business, no longer in service," said Amy Hair, an ASL interpreter. "I called the other cell phone number; that was out of service.Other top categories on the complaint list include home improvement repairs, retail purchases and consumer debt and credit.In total, consumer advocacy groups collected 208,000 complaints in 2021 a small decrease from the prior year.They secured over $119 million in relief for consumers also less than in 2020.

Mermaids Aren't Just Entertainers. Many Are Environmental Advocates kostenlos streamen | dailyme

Mermaids Aren't Just Entertainers. Many Are Environmental Advocates

Water, fins and a sense of adventure the fantasy is real in Sacramento, California.  "The community is great, but for me, it was kind of like an escape, you know?" merman Onyx said. "So, don a tail, and you can go anywhere."Merfolk of all kinds gather from across the country to the California Mermaid Convention in Sacramento to swim and celebrate all things under the sea.Mermaid Echo hails from the Great Lakes."All mermaids that you meet will love aquatic ecosystems and animals," Echo said.Outside their mermaid form, Echo is a wildlife specialist and a communications assistant for Wisconsins Department of Natural Resources.Echos other identity is as an edu-tainer, or educator and entertainer, who started her own business of professional "mermaiding.""In Wisconsin, you have to have like a 20-minute conversation with somebody to explain like, 'No, it's not crazy. I'm not a crazy person. I don't actually think I'm a real mermaid. This is a tool I use to teach kids,'" Echo said. The price of being a mermaid can range. A fabric tail can cost between $60 to $200. Silicon tails like Echos can cost between $1,300 to $5,000."I think anybody can be a mermaid," Echo said. "It's just a matter of mentality. Know you can just believe in the ocean and for caring for it, and you can be a mermaid."The merfolk say what they do is more than playing dress-up. It's also advocating for clean water."Mermaids have a really unique opportunity as educators because we look approachable and friendly and fun and people want to ask questions," said mermaid Rachel, co-organizer of the California Mermaid Convention. "Then we have a platform to talk about all of these ongoing issues."Some merfolk are just in it for the fun of the fins, but some aim to educate others. They organize clean-up projects, raise money for environmental efforts  and teach water conservation."The flashy costumes draws people's attention and makes them think, 'Wow, what's going on over here, and how can I be a part of it?" said Teresa Henry, of Nerdtistic Park.Echo teaches other educators fun ways to engage children and adults young at heart about the environment."A really easy thing that people can do is turn that water off when you're brushing your teeth, or you can also bring reusable bags to the grocery store," Echo said. "But more importantly than anything, remember that it's not an individual issue. It's a corporations issue."Nearly two-thirds of global carbon emissions can be traced to 90 major companies, says a 2017 study from the University of Oxford. The increase of carbon emissions has contributed to climate change and a rise in sea levels."Oceans are obviously very important, and we need to protect our coral reefs and all of our endangered animals," Echo said. "But the number one most endangered aquatic system on the planet is freshwater ecosystems."For Echo, who has a science background, mermaiding is about combining environmentalism and fun and inspiring future generations to keep swimming forward.

Louisiana Abortion Clinic Flooding With Out-Of-State Patients kostenlos streamen | dailyme

Louisiana Abortion Clinic Flooding With Out-Of-State Patients

The license plates on the cars that crowd this parking lot are all from Texas. But we're not in Texas. We're in Shreveport, Louisiana. Latricia had to drive three hours from Houston to bring her niece to Hope Medical Group for an abortion. Long wait times and transportation issues provided roadblocks that almost prevented her niece from getting care. "This was like her last resort, her last appointment. So we'll get it done here. She tried everywhere else," Latricia said. "It doesn't make sense at all, why we have to leave home to get to get care that we have the right to get."But in her home state, those rights just aren't the same anymore. A 2021 law effectively bans abortion in Texas after about six weeksand if the leaked Supreme Court draft opinion becomes the final opinion, access will become even more limited for women across the country. Before the Texas law, 18% of the patients here were from Texas. Clinic Director Kathaleen Pittman says the spillover from Texas, in conjunction with already restrictive abortion laws in Louisiana, has created an incredible backup in her clinic. Previously, most abortions were done between six and 10 weeks with a two-dose pill to end pregnancy. But because of the long wait list to get an appointment, now most women will need a surgical procedure.  "By the end of September, we were running 37% Texas. By the end of October, we were at 57% Texas. And it kept going up at one point we were like at 73%," Pittman said. "The majority of them are 10 through 13. And we've doubled the number of second trimester cases. On any given day, we have anywhere from 120 to 150 people on our waiting lists, just for us to call them and make that initial appointment."Pittman is sending women to New Mexico for the abortion medication but she's worried about the women who are timing out for care. The clinic only performs abortions through 16.5 weeks. They also must have two appointments mandated by law  one for consultation, and then after a 24-hour waiting period, one for the actual procedure.  "A lot of women do not understand," Pittman continued. "Why should I have to come twice? This is all I've thought about since I had a positive test, and you know, as with most women. So, for legislators to think that women haven't given it enough thought is, it's more than laughable. It's actually just, it's just wrong."Latricia and her niece had to get a hotel room, which is a setback that costs both of them time and money. But she recognizes if this situation had happened in another few weeks, her niece would have no easy option. Pittman is trying not to worry yet, but this clinic would be shut down if the leaked opinion stands. "Take a deep breath, reassure the staff, reassure the patients: 'You're here and now we'll take care of you now. I just don't know if we can in the future,'" Pittman said.Louisiana is one of more than a dozen states with a trigger law, meaning if Roe is overturned, abortion becomes illegal in those states overnight. Women in Louisiana will be forced to drive, on average, the furthest in the nation for care. A total ban would force the driving time from 37 miles to a clinic to a whopping 666 miles for care. The closest states for most women would be Illinois or North Carolina. That's a 1,720% increase in mileage.  "Nobody cares about the women. No, certainly not the politicians," Pittman said.Forty years ago, there were 18 abortion clinics in the state of Louisiana. Ten years later, the number stayed relatively stagnant at 17. But by 2014, decades of anti-abortion legislation had forced most facilities to close. Now there are only four operational facilities in the entire state. Jodi Burns is doing a different kind of planning. "We're set up for a post-Roe society," she said. "I believe that we are going to need to increase just again, continue to expand our services."She's the executive director at Heart of Hope, which is just about 20 minutes from the clinic. The massive property houses, educates and takes care of young girls as they navigate their pregnancy and early motherhood. The community-funded program is expanding now in preparation for the Supreme Court decision, adding care over the phone and adding more apartments on their property. "I really feel like we have really turned a corner were we are," Burns said.While Burns says abortion is free to exist in other states, if the Supreme Court sides in her favor, she doesn't want to see the option in hers. She believes education and available resources will change the minds of women needing care.  "I have never met a woman that regretted giving life, but I have met many women and I'm one of them that regretted not giving life,"


HOLE DIR DIE APP

MEHR INHALTE INKLUSIVE, OFFLINE-MODUS:

Google Play Store
App Store

DAILYME TV IM WEB: